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Liquid Computing Dries Up

liquidThe first half of the previous decade brought about quite a series of HPC startups.  With the advent of widely accepted, commodity HPC; startups popped up across the industry with offerings in tightly coupled cluster platforms and a score of software offerings.  One such startup, Liquid Computing, latest longer than most, but will soon close its doors.

According to an article in the Ottawa Citizen, the Canadian platform vendor was recently unable to find additional funding to further development and operations.  Last week, 20 of the Ottawa-based employees were laid off.  Chief exec, hired only 14 months ago to bring the company back around, has also left.

We thought we were in position for a new round of funding but two of our three major investors were unable to contribute,” Liquid chairman Adam Chowaniec said Thursday.

We have no alternative, but to start winding down the company to preserve as much of the intellectual property as possible.”

Founded back in 2003 by former telecom engineers, Liquid raised a total of ~$50million US in order to develop their “unified computing” platform.  The platform stood as one of the first unified compute and networking platforms with an integrated software stack but failed to gain much traction in HPC.

After going through a rough spot roughly eighteen months ago, the company refocused their efforts and energy on traditional data center markets.  Unfortunately, this meant direct competition from IBM, HP, Dell and the new Cisco unified computing solution.

The company and its investors tried to find additional streams of funding, but it just didn’t work out in time.

Pat DiPietro, a Liquid director and partner with VG Partners, formerly VenGrowth, said backers “are trying to assemble a package to keep the company going but there is just no capital anywhere.”

Liquid, as with many startups, had a real issue with identifying their core markets and core competencies.  HPC, as a whole, is niche.  Generally speaking, its a tough market to break into with a very fickle set of customers.  I hope the employees of Liquid have success in finding fruitful employment soon.

For more info on Liquid’s entrance into the HPC Dead Pool, read the full article here.

Comments

  1. Jose Miguel says:

    Yes, it is a sad moment for us. We also developed a UCS system for the enterprise ahead of Cisco but it is hard to sell hardware as a start-up.

    Many thanks for the good wishes for the employees to find jobs. We will, we were a good team

    RIP

  2. Marc Desjardins says:

    What a scam, I mean a shame!

  3. Marc Desjardins says:

    What happens to all those millions and millions of share options that managmement gave each other for doing such a great job?

  4. John Hall says:

    The share options you ask about amount to a big NOTHING!
    Yes they are worthless, like most of the mangers at Liquid Computing.
    I guess they got their just reward for doing such a great job!
    Was it really worth it?
    lol, what a joke.

  5. John Hall says:

    I Hope that door didn’t hit their asses on the way out!!!!!!

Trackbacks

  1. Log says:

    […] I am afraid I have made a wrong name for my project. Today I notice a start up called “liquid” is running out of business. While the “liquid” or “flex” are popular […]

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