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Michael L. Norman Named Director of the San Diego Supercomputer Center

SDSC logoThe San Diego Supercomputer Center [SDSC] officially announced that they have named Michael L Norman as the new director of the center.  Norman, a distinguished professor of physics at UC San Diego and a globally recognized computational astrophysicist, had been SDSC’s interim director since July 2009 and chief scientific officer of the supercomputer center since June 2008.

Dr. Norman has demonstrated the vision and leadership the SDSC needs as we enter an era of daunting challenges, accelerating changes, and very promising opportunities,” said Senior Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs Paul W. Drake. “We are confident that SDSC will maintain its preeminence under Mike’s leadership.”

Dr. Michael Norman has moved the San Diego Supercomputer Center into broader and deeper collaborations with researchers across the university’s entire research enterprise, first as Chief Scientific Officer, then as Interim Director of the center,” said Arthur B. Ellis, UC San Diego’s vice chancellor for research. “Mike has also been one of the architects of our campus’ blueprint for research cyberinfrastructure. As the center’s new director, Mike will continue to build partnerships within UC San Diego and the UC system and with research institutions nationally and globally.”

Norman, a pioneer in using advanced computational methods to explore the universe and its beginnings, was named a senior fellow of SDSC in 2000. He directs the Laboratory for Computational Astrophysics, a collaboration between UC San Diego and SDSC resulting in the widely-used ENZO community code for astrophysics and cosmology simulations on parallel computers.  He also is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Physical Society. He holds a B.S. in astronomy from Caltech, an M.S. and Ph.D. in engineering and applied science from UC Davis, and completed his post doctoral work at the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics in Garching, Germany, in 1984.

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