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Green Revolution Cooling Helps Tsubame-KFC Supercomputer Top the Green500

satoshiToday Green Revolution Cooling announced that their immersive cooling technology is used by the most efficient supercomputers in the world as ranked in the latest Green500 list. For the third consecutive year, the Green Revolution Cooling-powered Tsubame-KFC supercomputer at Tokyo Institute of Technology achieved top honors, ranking as the most efficient commercially available setup, and second overall.

This is truly a great win for us, as one of our systems has steadily remained among the most efficient supercomputers for three years in a row. This is unheard of in the highly competitive and fast-changing world of HPC. Tokyo Institute of Technology is a banner customer and we will continue to work with them to break more records,” said Christiaan Best, CEO and Founder of Green Revolution Cooling.

Both in November of 2013 and June 2014, the Tsubame-KFC (Kepler Fluid Cooling) system achieved the No.1 ranking on the Green500, also becoming the first supercomputer to break the 4 GFLOPS/W mark, ahead of its nearest competitor by over 20%. In this year’s edition, both of the top systems were immersion cooled, truly exemplifying the power and efficiency of this method of cooling. While the Tsubame was cooled by Green Revolution Cooling’s mineral oil based ElectroSafe coolant, the RIKEN system was cooled with a 3M Fluorinert fluid in a custom cooling solution.

Green Revolution Cooling has developed the CarnotJet System, a liquid submersion cooling system for any rack-based OEM server. It uses a non-toxic mineral oil with 1,200x more heat capacity by volume than air with end results which allow for 95% less cooling power used, 10-25% less server power used, dramatically reduced infrastructure costs and increased server reliability.

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Comments

  1. “also becoming the first supercomputer to break the 4 PFLOPs/W mark”

    Clearly that should be GLOPS/W.

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