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Cray’s Steve Scott Presents: Supercomputing Technologies and Trends: Where do we go from here?

stevescottIn this video from The Digital Future conference in Berlin, Steve Scott from Cray presents: Supercomputing Technologies and Trends: Where do we go from here?

“At our core we are technology pioneers. We work with our customers and users to understand what they’re trying to do and what problems they can’t solve with existing technologies. Then we develop complete supercomputing solutions that help them address their otherwise unanswerable questions. Our portfolio consists of three product lines: supercomputers, storage and data management systems, and data analytics solutions. We offer them individually or integrated into a complete solution depending on a customer’s need. Research and development at Cray is guided by our adaptive supercomputing vision. This vision is focused on delivering innovative, next-generation products that integrate diverse processing technologies into a unified architecture, enabling customers to surpass today’s limitations and meeting the market’s demand for realized performance.”

Steve Scott serves as Senior Vice President and Chief Technology Officer, responsible for guiding the long-term technical direction of Cray’s supercomputing, storage and analytics products. Dr. Scott rejoined Cray in 2014 after serving as principal engineer in the platforms group at Google and before that as the senior vice president and chief technology officer for NVIDIA’s Tesla business unit. Dr. Scott first joined Cray in 1992, after earning his Ph.D. in computer architecture and BSEE in computer engineering from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He was the chief architect of several Cray supercomputers and interconnects. Dr. Scott is a noted expert in high performance computer architecture and interconnection networks. He holds 35 U.S. patents in the areas of interconnection networks, cache coherence, synchronization mechanisms and scalable parallel architectures. He received the 2005 ACM Maurice Wilkes Award and the 2005 IEEE Seymour Cray Computer Engineering Award, and is a Fellow of IEEE and ACM.

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