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Bull Atos to Build for HPC Prototype for Mont-Blanc Project using Cavium ThunderX2 Processor

Today the Mont-Blanc European project announced it has selected Cavium’s ThunderX2 ARM server processor to power its new HPC prototype. The new Mont-Blanc prototype will be built by Atos, the coordinator of phase 3 of Mont-Blanc, using its Bull expertise and products. The platform will leverage the infrastructure of the Bull sequana pre-exascale supercomputer range for network, management, cooling, and power. Atos and Cavium signed an agreement to collaborate to develop this new platform, thus making Mont-Blanc an Alpha-site for ThunderX2.

Exascale Computing: A Race to the Future of HPC

In this week’s Sponsored Post, Nicolas Dube of Hewlett Packard Enterprise outlines the future of HPC and the role and challenges of exascale computing in this evolution. The HPE approach to exascale is geared to breaking the dependencies that come with outdated protocols. Exascale computing will allow users to process data, run systems, and solve problems at a totally new scale, which will become increasingly important as the world’s problems grow ever larger and more complex.

Oak Ridge Plays key role in Exascale Computing Project

Oak Ridge National Laboratory reports that its team of experts are playing leading roles in the recently established DOE’s Exascale Computing Project (ECP), a multi-lab initiative responsible for developing the strategy, aligning the resources, and conducting the R&D necessary to achieve the nation’s imperative of delivering exascale computing by 2021. “ECP’s mission is to ensure all the necessary pieces are in place for the first exascale systems – an ecosystem that includes applications, software stack, architecture, advanced system engineering and hardware components – to enable fully functional, capable exascale computing environments critical to scientific discovery, national security, and a strong U.S. economy.”

Reflecting on the Goal and Baseline for Exascale Computing

Thomas Schulthess from CSCS gave this Invited Talk at SC16. “Experience with today’s platforms show that there can be an order of magnitude difference in performance within a given class of numerical methods – depending only on choice of architecture and implementation. This bears the questions on what our baseline is, over which the performance improvements of Exascale systems will be measured. Furthermore, how close will these Exascale systems bring us to deliver on application goals, such as kilometer scale global climate simulations or high-throughput quantum simulations for materials design? We will discuss specific examples from meteorology and materials science.”

The Festivus Airing of Grievances from Radio Free HPC

In this podcast, the Radio Free HPC team honors the Festivus tradition of the annual Airing of Grievances. Our random gripes include: the need for a better HPC benchmark suite, the missed opportunity for ARM servers, the skittish battery in the new Macbook Pro, and a lack of an industry standards body for cloud computing.

SAGE Project Looks to Percipient Storage for Exascale

“The SAGE project, which incorporates research and innovation in hardware and enabling software, will significantly improve the performance of data I/O and enable computation and analysis to be performed more locally to data wherever it resides in the architecture, drastically minimizing data movements between compute and data storage infrastructures. With a seamless view of data throughout the platform, incorporating multiple tiers of storage from memory to disk to long-term archive, it will enable API’s and programming models to easily use such a platform to efficiently utilize the most appropriate data analytics techniques suited to the problem space.”

Thomas Sterling Presents: HPC Runtime System Software for Asynchronous Multi-Tasking

Thomas Sterling presented this Invited Talk at SC16. “Increasing sophistication of application program domains combined with expanding scale and complexity of HPC system structures is driving innovation in computing to address sources of performance degradation. This presentation will provide a comprehensive review of driving challenges, strategies, examples of existing runtime systems, and experiences. One important consideration is the possible future role of advances in computer architecture to accelerate the likely mechanisms embodied within typical runtimes. The talk will conclude with suggestions of future paths and work to advance this possible strategy.”

Call for Papers: AsHES Exascale Workshop 2017 in Orlando

The Seventh International Workshop on Accelerators and Hybrid Exascale Systems (AsHES) has issued its Call for Papers. The event takes place May 29 in Orlando, Florida in conjunction with the IEEE International Parallel and Distributed Processing Symposium.

Fast Networking for Next Generation Systems

“The Intel Omni-Path Architecture is an example of a networking system that has been designed for the Exascale era. There are many features that will enable this massive scaling of compute resources. Features and functionality are designed in at both the host and the fabric levels. This enables very large scaling when all of the components are designed together. Increased reliability is a result of integrating the CPU and fabric, which will be critical as the number of nodes expands well beyond any system in operation today. In addition, tools and software that have been designed to be installed and managed at the very large number of compute nodes that will be necessary to achieve this next level of performance.”

Radio Free HPC Looks at the Past and Future of the OS

In this podcast, the Radio Free HPC team looks at the future of Operating Systems in the new world of computing. In a world that seems to be moving to the cloud and microservices, what will happen to the monolithic OS we have come to know and love?