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IBM to Build Commercially Available Quantum Computing Systems

“IBM has invested over decades to growing the field of quantum computing and we are committed to expanding access to quantum systems and their powerful capabilities for the science and business communities,” said Arvind Krishna, senior vice president of Hybrid Cloud and director for IBM Research. “Following Watson and blockchain, we believe that quantum computing will provide the next powerful set of services delivered via the IBM Cloud platform, and promises to be the next major technology that has the potential to drive a new era of innovation across industries.”

Andrew Ng on why Artificial Intelligence is the New Electricity

“Electricity transformed industries: agriculture, transportation, communication, manufacturing. I think we are now in that phase where AI technology has advanced to the point where we see a clear path for it to transform multiple industries.” Specifically, Ng sees AI being particularly influential in entertainment, retail, and logistics.

Job of the Week: HPC Software Development Engineer at AWS

“The Amazon Web Services High Performance Computing (HPC) team is looking for Software Development Engineers (SDEs) to help drive the development of new features, functionality, and capabilities for AWS Batch. AWS Batch is developed by a newly formed team building a core set of offerings that allow our customers to plan, schedule, and execute batch computing workloads across the full range of AWS compute services and capabilities.”

Slidecast: ARM Steps Up to Machine Learning

In this slidecast, Jem Davies (VP Engineering and ARM Fellow) gives a brief introduction to Machine Learning and explains how it is used in devices such as smartphones, autos, and drones. “I do think that machine learning altogether is probably going to be one of the biggest shifts in computing that we’ll see in quite a few years. I’m reluctant to put a number on it like — the biggest thing in 25 years or whatever,” said Jem Davies in a recent investor call. “But this is going to be big. It is going to affect all of us. It affects quite a lot of ARM, in fact.”

Fathom Neural Compute Stick Enables Mobile Devices to React Cognitively

Intel-owned Movidius has introduced a fascinating new device called the Fathom Neural Compute Stick, a modular deep learning accelerator in the form of a standard USB stick. “The Fathom Neural Compute Stick is the first of its kind: A powerful, yet surprisingly efficient Deep Learning processor embedded into a standard USB stick. The Fathom Neural Compute Stick acts as a discrete neural compute accelerator, allowing devices with a USB port run neural networks at high speed, while sipping under a single Watt of power.”

Supermicro Rolls Out New SuperBlade with EDR InfiniBand and OmniPath

“Our new SuperBlade optimizes not just TCO, but initial acquisition cost with industry-leading server density and maximum performance per watt, per square foot and per dollar,” said Charles Liang, President and CEO of Supermicro. “Our 8U SuperBlade is also the first and only blade system that supports up to 205W Xeon CPUs, NVMe drives and 100G EDR IB or Omni-Path switches ensuring that this architecture is optimized for today and future proofed for the next generation of technology advancements, including next generation Intel Skylake processors.”

Bringing HPC Algorithms to Big Data Platforms

Nikolay Malitsky from Brookhaven National Laboratory presented this talk at the Spark Summit East conference. “This talk will present a MPI-based extension of the Spark platform developed in the context of light source facilities. The background and rationale of this extension are described in the paper “Bringing the HPC reconstruction algorithms to Big Data platforms.” which highlighted a gap between two modern driving forces of the scientific discovery process: HPC and Big Data technologies. As a result, it proposed to extend the Spark platform with inter-worker communication for supporting scientific-oriented parallel applications.”

OFA Workshop Posts Session Abstracts for Austin Meeting in March

Today the OpenFabrics Alliance (OFA) published the session abstracts for its 13th Annual OFA Workshop. Sponsored by Intel, the workshop takes place March 27-31 in Austin, Texas. “The workshop will include more than 50 sessions covering a variety of critical networking topics delivered by industry experts from around the world. Additionally, the OFA has announced that Al Geist of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will deliver a workshop keynote address on the impact of the Exascale Computing Project. The workshop program is designed to educate attendees and encourage lively exchanges among OFA members, developers, and users who share a vested interest in high performance networks.”

Mellanox ConnectX-5 Sets DPDK Performance Record with 100Gb/s Ethernet

“The I/O intensive nature of the Virtualized Network Functions (VNFs) including virtual Firewall, virtual Evolved Packet Core (vEPC), virtual Session Border Controller (vSBC), Anti-DDoS and Deep Packet Inspection (DPI) applications have posed significant challenges to build cost-effective NFV Infrastructures that meet packet rate, latency, jitter and security requirements. Leveraging its wealth of experience in building high-performance server/storage I/O components and switching systems for High Performance Computing, Hyperscale data centers, and telecommunications operators, Mellanox has the industry’s broadest range of intelligent Ethernet NIC and switch solutions; spanning interface speeds from 10, 25, 40, 50 to 100Gb/s.”

Podcast: How Humans Bias AI

In this AI Podcast, Kris Hammond from Narrative Science explains that while it’s easy to think of AI as cold, unbiased, and objective, it is also very good at repeating our own bias against us. “I am not saying that we should give ourselves over to algorithmic decision-making. We should always remember that just as the machine is free of the cognitive biases that often defeat us, we have information about the world that the machine does not. My argument is that, with intelligent systems, we now have the opportunity to be genuinely smarter.”