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Hurry! Enter SC15 Student Cluster Competition by April 17

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The clock is ticking down for teams to submit their applications for the SC15 Student Cluster Competition. The deadline to apply for a spot in this year’s competition is Friday, April 17.

Open Computing Benefits Many Industry Segments

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The Open Compute Project is a way for organization to increase computing power while lowering associated costs with hyper-scale computing. This article is the 4th in a series from insideHPC that showcases the benefits of open computing to specific industries.

Radio Free HPC Looks at the Aurora Supercomputer Coming to Argonne in 2018

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In this podcast, the Radio Free HPC team looks at the 180 Aurora supercomputer coming to Argonne in 2018. “As the third of three Coral supercomputer procurements, the deal will comprise an 8.5 Petaflop “Theta” system based on Knights Landing in 2016 and a much larger 180 Petaflop “Aurora” supercomputer in 2018. Intel will be the prime contractor on the deal, with sub-contractor Cray building the actual supercomputers.”

Video: How Aurora Will Usher in a New Era for HPC

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“The selection of Intel to deliver the Aurora supercomputer is validation of our unique position to lead a new era in HPC,” said Raj Hazra, vice president, Data Center Group and general manager, Technical Computing Group at Intel. “Intel’s HPC scalable system framework enables balanced, scalable and efficient systems while extending the ecosystem’s decades of software investment to future generations. We look forward to the numerous scientific discoveries and the far-reaching impacts on society that Aurora will enable.”

Podcast: Michael Papka and Susan Coghlan on the 180 Petaflop Aurora Supercomputer

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In this Tech Shift podcast, Michael Papka and Susan Coghlan from Argonne National Laboratory discuss the 180 Petaflop Aurora supercomputer scheduled for deployment in 2018.

Parallel Implementation of PK-PD Parameter Estimation on Intel Xeon Phi

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“Pharmacokinetic (PK) and Pharmacodynamic(PD) parameters determine the develop-ability of a drug candidate and estimation of them are time consuming and there is an urgent need for time efficient approaches. In the present talk, we showcase the parallel implementation of Grid search method on Xeon Phi using stepwise optimization techniques as a promising approach for the robust estimation of PK-PD parameters. The solution described herein, is of great importance in decision making in Pharmaceutical Industry.”

HPC Helps Solve Challenges of Personalized Medicine

Genomic Sequencing

A number of challenges exist for both the wider adoption of technologies that can impede personalized medicine workflows and the implementation of such systems. Learn more on how companies like Dell and Intel are delivering complete integrated genomic processing infrastructure.

New OSC Supercomputer Named After Civil Rights Activist Ruby Dee

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Today the Ohio Supercomputer Center unveiled their new 144 Teraflop Ruby supercomputer. Powered by Intel Xeon Phi, the 144 Teraflop HP system is named after Cleveland-born activist Ruby Dee.

A Closer Look at Intel’s Coral Supercomputers Coming to Argonne

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This morning Intel and the U.S. Department of Energy announced a $200 million supercomputing investment coming to Argonne National Laboratory. As the third of three Coral supercomputer procurements, the deal will comprise an 8.5 Petaflop “Theta” system based on Knights Landing in 2016 and a much larger 180 Petaflop “Aurora” supercomputer in 2018. Intel will be the prime contractor on the deal, with sub-contractor Cray building the actual supercomputers.

Intel to Deliver Nation’s Most Powerful Supercomputer at Argonne

Congressman Dan Lipinski

Today Intel announced that the company will deliver two next-generation supercomputers to Argonne National Laboratory. “The contract is part of the DOE’s multimillion dollar initiative to build state-of-the-art supercomputers at Argonne, Lawrence Livermore and Oak Ridge National Laboratories that will be five to seven times more powerful than today’s top supercomputers.”