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Building Bridges to the Future

“The Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center recently added Bridges to its lineup of world-class supercomputers. Bridges is designed for uniquely flexible, interoperating capabilities to empower research communities that previously have not used HPC and enable new data-driven insights. It also provides exceptional performance to traditional HPC users. It converges the best of High Performance Computing (HPC), High Performance Data Analytics (HPDA), machine learning, visualization, Web services, and community gateways in a single architecture.”

Dell Powers 1 Petaflop Lengau Supercomputer for CHPC in South Africa

“Dell is proud to collaborate with South Africa’s CSIR on the delivery of the fastest HPC system in Africa. The Lengau system will provide access and open doors to help drive new research, new innovations and new national economic benefits,” said Jim Ganthier, vice president and general manager, Engineered Solutions, HPC and Cloud at Dell. “While Lengau benefits from the latest technology advancements, from performance to density to energy efficiency, the most important benefit is that Lengau will enable new opportunities and avenues in research, the ability to help spur private sector growth in South Africa and, ultimately, help enable human potential.”

Time-lapse Video: Cray Install at UK Met Office

In this video, technicians install a new supercomputer at UK Met Office. The Met Office is the National Weather Service for the UK, providing internationally-renowned weather and climate science and services to support the public, government and businesses.

University of Iceland Unveils Lenovo Supercomputer

Today the University of Iceland unveiled a new supercomputer that will boost research in a range of scientific areas. Manufactured by Lenovo, the cluster was funded by the Research Infrastructure Fund Iceland with matching funds from the University of Iceland, Reykjavik University.

Ohio Supercomputer Center Names New Cluster after Jesse Owens

The Ohio Supercomputer Center has named its newest HPC cluster after Olympic champion Jesse Owens. The new Owens Cluster will be powered by Dell PowerEdge servers featuring the new Intel Xeon processor E5-2600 v4 product family, include storage components manufactured by DDN, and utilize interconnects provided by Mellanox. “Our newest supercomputer system is the most powerful that the Center has ever run,” ODHE Chancellor John Carey said in a recent letter to Owens’ daughters. “As such, I thought it fitting to name it for your father, who symbolizes speed, integrity and, most significantly for me, compassion as embodied by his tireless work to help youths overcome obstacles to their future success. As a first-generation college graduate, I can relate personally to the value of mentors in the lives of those students.”

DWD Weather Service in Germany Upgrades Cray Systems

Today Cray announced a contract to upgrade the supercomputers at Germany’s National Meteorological Service – the Deutscher Wetterdienst (DWD). Located in Offenbach, Germany, DWD is one of the world’s premier numerical weather prediction centers. “Supercomputers are absolutely vital to our mission of providing important meteorological services for the protection of life and property,” said. Dr. Jochen Dibbern, Member of the Executive Board at DWD. “Our Cray supercomputers are critical tools for our researchers and scientists, and it’s imperative that we equip our users with highly advanced supercomputing technologies.”

NNSA Unleashes Advanced Computing Capabilities to Serve Researchers at Three National Labs

NNSA’s next-generation Penguin Computing clusters based on Intel SSF are bolstering “capacity” computing capability at the Tri Labs. “With CTS1 installed in April, the NNSA scientists can continue their stewardship research and management on some of the most advanced commodity clusters the Tri Labs have acquired, ensuring the safety, security, and reliability of the nation’s nuclear stockpile.”

SGI Provides Total with Improved Modeling to Support Decision Making

Total, one of the largest integrated oil and gas companies in the world, announced they are boosting the compute power of their SGI Pangea supercomputer with an additional 4.4 petaflops provided by a new SGI ICE X system and based on the Intel Xeon processor. Purchased last year, the new SGI system is now in production and will allow Total to determine the optimal extraction methods more quickly. The SGI supercomputer allows Total to improve complex modeling of the subsurface and to simulate the behavior of reservoirs, reducing the time and costs associated with discovering and extracting energy reserves.

Bull Builds Bura Supercomputer at University of Rijeka

Today Bull Atos announced it has successfully installed the most powerful supercomputer in the Adriatic region. Named after the Croatia North Wind, the new Bura supercomputer at the University of Rijeka will be used in biotechnological and biomedical research and will be available to institutions and companies from abroad.

Pople HPC Cluster to Power Research at University of Western Australia

Researchers are using the new Pople HPC cluster to study gravitational waves at the University of Western Australia. “Pople places the Faculty of Science in a unique position for supporting advanced research across all areas of research in the Faculty” said Dr Amir Karton. “For example, it will be used for conducting multi-scale simulations of biochemical processes, studying gravitational waves, and simulating combustion processes which generate compounds important for seed germination. Such research could have been previously carried out only on national supercomputers, now these capabilities are accessible to any researcher in the Faculty.”