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Radio Free HPC Takes a Hilarious Look at the Turing Test

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In this podcast, the Radio Free HPC team looks at the Turing Test for artificial intelligence. Does the Turing Test need to be retired as discussed on insideHPC, or does it just need an update for modern culture? The discussion quickly degrades into what may be our funniest show ever!

Will Containerization Eat Configuration Management?

Christian Kniep

Over at QNIB, Christian Kniep writes that his latest presentation examines intersection of Docker, Containerization, and Configuration Management. “In my humble opinion, Configuration Management might become a niche. As hard as it sounds.”

How the Human Brain Project will Push Supercomputing

Bernd Mohr

Over at TOP500.org, Bernd Mohr writes that Europe’s Human Brain Project will have a main production system located at the Juelich Supercomputing Centre. “The HBP supercomputer will be built in stages, with an intermediate “pre-exascale” system on the order of 50 petaflops planned for the 2016-18 timeframe. Full brain simulations are expected to require exascale capabilities, which, according to most potential suppliers’ roadmaps, are likely to be available in, approximately 2021-22.”

Why Storage Matters to HPC

In this special guest feature from Scientific Computing World, Robert Roe writes that the era of data-centric HPC is upon us. He then investigates how data storage companies are rising to the challenge. In August 2014, a ‘Task Force on High Performance Computing’ reported to the US Department of Energy that data-centric computing will be […]

Radio Free HPC Reviews 2014 – The Year in HPC

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In this podcast, Rich, Dan, and Henry review the year in HPC. It was a wild ride, and here we highlight some of our best shows from the past twelve months and the technology milestones that made 2014 a banner year in high performance computing. And did I mention we have a few laughs along the way?

Interview: Advancing Computational Chemistry with NWChem

Karol Kowalski, Capability Lead for NWChem Development at PNNL

“The notion of High Performance Computing is evolving over time. So what was deemed a leadership class computer five years ago is a little bit obsolete. We are talking about the evolution not only in the hardware but also in the programming models because there are more and more cores available. Orchestrating the calculations in the way that can effectively take advantage of parallelism takes a lot of thinking and a lot of redesign of the algorithms behind the calculations.”

Time to Retire the Turing Test?

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If you haven’t heard, there is a new film about Alan Turing, one of the original computer scientists to ponder the question: Can machines think? Over at Kill Screen, David Shimomura writes that it may be time to put the Turing Test to bed.

John Barr on the Power and the Processor

John Barr

In this special guest feature from Scientific Computing World, John Barr surveys the technologies that will underpin the next generation of HPC processors and finds that software, not hardware, holds the key.

Slidecast: Cycle Computing Powers 70,000-core AWS Cluster for HGST

stowe

Has Cloud HPC finally made it’s way to the Missing Middle? In this slidecast, Jason Stowe from Cycle Computing describes how the company enabled HGST to spin up a 70,000-core cluster from AWS and then return it 8 hours later. “One of HGST’s engineering workloads seeks to find an optimal advanced drive head design, taking 30 days to complete on an in-house cluster. In layman terms, this workload runs 1 million simulations for designs based upon 22 different design parameters running on 3 drive media Running these simulations using an in-house, specially built simulator, the workload takes approximately 30 days to complete on an internal cluster.”

Why Innovation Shouldn’t be a Dirty Secret

Richard Holland

In this special guest feature from Scientific Computing World, Richard Holland from the Pistoia Alliance considers how even competitors can work together to lower the barriers to innovation, without giving away their commercial secrets.