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Radio Free HPC Looks at PCIe 4.0 Delays and the New HP Apollo Servers

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In this podcast, the Radio Free HPC team looks newly announced delays for the PCIe 4.0 specification and why this is bad news for high performance computing. After that, the topic switches to the new liquid-cooled Apollo 8000 servers from HP.

Slidecast: HP Apollo Servers for HPC

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In this slidecast, John Gromala from HP describes the company’s new Apollo series of HPC servers. Tailor-made for the HPC market, the Apollo Series combines a modular design with innovative power distribution and air- and liquid-cooling techniques for extreme performance at rack scale, providing up to four times more performance per square foot than standard rack servers.

Podcast: The Science Behind the FIFA “Brazuca” Soccer Ball

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In this podcast from Science Friday, Ira Flatow, Bill Nye, and Simon Choppin discuss the science behind a new, specially designed soccer ball: the Brazuca. Adidas is touting its new ball as the latest in sports technology, but will it fare better than its World Cup predecessor, Adidas’ “Jabulani,” which apparently flew like a “knuckleball” and was detested by players?

This Week in HPC: HP Launches Apollo and Sets Roadmap for the Future

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In this episode of This Week in HPC, Michael Feldman and Addison Snell from Intersect360 Research discuss HP’s new Apollo family of HPC systems and the companies IT vision for the future.

Slidecast: Five Essential Strategies for Successful HPC Clusters

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“A successful HPC cluster requires administrators to provision, manage, and monitor an array of hardware and software components. Currently, there are many trends in HPC clustering that include software complexity, cluster growth and scalability, system heterogeneity, Cloud computing, as well as the introduction of Hadoop services. Without a cogent strategy to address these issues, system managers and administrators can expect less-than-ideal performance and utilization. There are many component tools and best practices to be found throughout the industry.”

Radio Free HPC Recommends Summer Tech Reading

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In this podcast, the Radio Free HPC team looks at a couple of techie books for Summer reading. It’s page-turning stuff–both books look at what happens when high performance computing is no longer just a force for good.

This Week in HPC: Arista Spikes in IPO and a New HPC Market Forecast

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In this episode of This Week in HPC, Michael Feldman and Addison Snell from Intersect360 Research discuss Arista Network’s IPO. After the break, the topic switches over to the new HPC Market Forecast from Intersect360 Research.

This Week in HPC: Bull to be Acquired by ATOS & Notes from the HPCAC Brazil Conference

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In this episode of This Week in HPC, Michael Feldman and Addison Snell from Intersect360 Research discuss the pending acquisition of Bull by Atos. After the break, they note some of the highlights from the recent HPC Advisory Council Brazil Conference.

Podcast: Radio Free HPC Previews the ISC’14 Student Cluster Challenge

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“The third HPCAC-ISC Student Cluster Challenge at ISC’14 is an opportunity to showcase student expertise in a friendly yet spirited competition. The competition will feature 11 small teams that compete to demonstrate the incredible capabilities of state-of- the-art high-performance cluster hardware and software.”

Podcast: Fabric Integration is Coming to Intel True Scale

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“With Fabric Integration, you pick up five value vectors. One is an in increase in performance; so the closer you can drive the fabric to the CPU, the more things you can do to increase the overall performance of both the CPU, and the fabric together. Number two, you pick up density. Because now you’re not taking up any board space or PCIe slots and things like that. Number three, you pick up also the options for improved value, in terms of price per performance. Number four, you reduce power. And number five, by getting rid of things like the PCIe bus, you reduce componentry – which again reduces power – as well as improves reliability.”