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UK Met Office Research Simulations Predict European Winter One Year Ahead

In a paper published today in Nature Geoscience, scientists at the Met Office have demonstrated significant advances in predicting up to one year ahead the phases of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), which drives European and North American winter variability. The NAO – a large-scale gradient in air pressure measured between low pressure around Iceland and high pressure around the Azores – is the primary driver of winter climate variability for Europe.

The High Performance Virtual Computer for Graphics-Intensive Applications

Many industries deploy graphics-intensive applications on single user workstations with individual GPU resources. For those who have switched to a virtualization based environment, many of the legacy desktop virtualization platforms can’t support high end GPUs or multiple GPU configurations. Together with partners like Cisco and One Stop Systems, a London-based tech start-up ebb3 has created the High Performance Virtual Computer (HPVC) to tackle this issue with the aim of creating the fastest performing solution in the world.

PASC17 Conference to Focus on HPC & Precision Medicine

Today the PASC17 Conference announced a track focused on Precision Medicine as Special Topic for Emerging Domains. “Precision medicine, also referred to as personalized medicine, is an emerging domain that is adding tremendous value to the study of life sciences and medical treatment. The requirements that it has for rapid – and secure – processing, analysis and management of vast quantities of data in a wide range of different medical environments make precision medicine ideally suited to high performance computing.”

Supercomputing Tornadogenesis

“We’re trying to make high resolution simulations of super cell storms, or tornadoes,” McGovern said. “What we get with the simulations are the fundamental variables of whatever our resolution is — we’ve been doing 100 meter x 100 meter cubes — there’s no way you can get that kind of data without doing simulations. We’re getting the fundamental variables like pressure, temperature and wind, and we’re doing that for a lot of storms, some of which will generate tornadoes and some that won’t. The idea is to do data mining and visualization to figure out what the difference is between the two.”

Dell Powers RENCI Supercomputer Tracking Hurricane Matthew

RENCI’s Dell-powered supercomputer is working overtime to model the storm surge that Hurricane Matthew could bring to communities along the Eastern Seaboard. Named Hatteras, the 150-node M610 Dell cluster runs the ADCIRC storm surge model every six hours when a hurricane is active. “We are working on doing storm surge predictions the same way that meteorologists develop predictions for rain and wind speeds.”

Huawei and ESI to Collaborate on HPC for Manufacturing

ESI Group has signed agreement with Huawei to collaborate on on High Performance Computing and cloud computing for industrial manufacturing solutions for customers in China and worldwide. “The ongoing digital transformation of industrial manufacturing demands enterprise-level IT solutions that are more intelligent, efficient, and convenient, especially in the HPC domain,” said Zheng Yelai, President, Huawei IT Product Line.

Pegasus 5 CFD Program Wins NASA’s Software of the Year

Over at NASA, Michelle Moyers writes that the 2016 NASA Software of the Year Award has gone to Pegasus 5, a revolutionary CFD tool. “Developed in-house by a team led by aerospace engineer Stuart Rogers from NASA Ames, Pegasus 5 has been used for aerodynamic modeling and simulation by nearly every NASA program over the past 15 years, including the space shuttle, the next-generation Orion spacecraft and Space Launch System, and commercial crew programs.”

Supercomputing Alternative Energy in the Eastern Power Grid

“By modeling the power system in depth and detail, NREL has helped reset the conversation about how far we can go operationally with wind and solar in one of the largest power systems in the world,” said the Energy Department’s Charlton Clark, a DOE program manager for the study. “Releasing the production cost model, underlying data, and visualization tools alongside the final report reflects our commitment to giving power system planners, operators, regulators, and others the tools to anticipate and plan for operational and other important changes that may be needed in some cleaner energy futures.”

Supercomputing 3D Elevation Maps of Alaska on Blue Waters

Today, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency and NSF released 3-D topographic maps that show Alaska’s terrain in greater detail than ever before. Powered by the Blue Waters supercomputer, the maps are the result of a White House Arctic initiative to inform better decision-making in the Arctic. “We can’t live without Blue Waters now,” said Paul Morin, head of the University of Minnesota’s Polar Geospatial Center. “The supercomputer itself, the tools the Blue Waters team at NCSA developed, the techniques they’ve come up with in using this hardware. Blue Waters is changing the way digital terrain is made and that is changing how science is done in the Arctic.”

Simulating the Earliest Generations of Galaxies with Enzo and Blue Waters

“Galaxies are complex—many physical processes operate simultaneously, and over a huge range of scales in space and time. As a result, accurately modeling the formation and evolution of galaxies over the lifetime of the universe presents tremendous technical challenges. In this talk I will describe some of the important unanswered questions regarding galaxy formation, discuss in general terms how we simulate the formation of galaxies on a computer, and present simulations (and accompanying published results) that the Enzo collaboration has recently done on the Blue Waters supercomputer. In particular, I will focus on the transition from metal-free to metal-enriched star formation in the universe, as well as the luminosity function of the earliest generations of galaxies and how we might observe it with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope.”