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Phytium from China Unveils 64-core ARM HPC Processor

This week at the Hot Chips conference, Phytium Technology from China unveiled a 64-core CPU and a related prototype computer server. “Phytium says the new CPU chip, with 64-bit arithmetic compatible with ARMv8 instructions, is able to perform 512 GFLOPS at base frequency of 2.0 GHz and on 100 watts of power dissipation.”

Fujitsu Unveils Processor Details for Post-K Computer

The Fujitsu Journal has posted details on a recent Hot Chips presentation by Toshio Yoshida about the instruction set architecture (ISA) of the Post-K processor. “The Post-K processor employs the ARM ISA, developed by ARM Ltd., with enhancements for supercomputer use. Meanwhile, Fujitsu has been developing the microarchitecture of the processor. In Fujitsu’s presentation, we also explained that our development of mainframe processors and UNIX server SPARC processors will continue into the future. The reason that Fujitsu is able to continuously develop multiple processors is our shared microarchitecture approach to processor development.”

ARM Ramps up for HPC with SVE Scalable Vector Extensions

Over at the ARM Community Blog, Nigel Stephens writes that the company has introduced scalable vector extensions (SVE) their A64 instruction set to bolster high performance computing. Fujitsu is developing a new HPC processor conforming to ARMv8-A with SVE for the Post-K computer.

Radio Free HPC Looks at What Chip Architectures Need to Succeed

In this podcast, the Radio Free HPC team welcomes Shahin Khan from OrionX to a discussion on chip architectures for HPC. “More and more new alternative architectures were in evidence at ISC in Germany this year, but what does it take for a chip architecture to be a winner? Looking back, chips like DEC Alpha had many advantages over the competition, but it did not survive.”

HSA 1.1 Specification Adds Multi-Vendor Architecture Support

The Heterogeneous System Architecture (HSA) Foundation has released the HSA 1.1 specification, significantly enhancing the ability to integrate open and proprietary IP blocks in heterogeneous designs. The new specification is the first to define the interfaces that enable IP blocks from different vendors to communicate, interoperate and collectively compose an HSA system.

Mellanox Introduces BlueField SoC Programmable Processors

Today Mellanox announced the BlueField family of programmable processors for networking and storage applications. “As a networking offload co-processor, BlueField will complement the host processor by performing wire-speed packet processing in-line with the network I/O, freeing the host processor to deliver more virtual networking functions (VNFs),” said Linley Gwennap, principal analyst at the Linley Group. “Network offload results in better rack density, lower overall power consumption, and deterministic networking performance.”

Four Reasons that Software Development is in the HPC Driving Seat for 2016

“Just as representative benchmarks like HPCG are set to replace Linpack, so a focus on software is taking over. From industry analysts to users at SC15 we heard that software is the number one challenge and the number one opportunity to have world-class impact.”

OpenACC 2.5 Includes Support for ARM and x86 Processors

The OpenACC Standards Group released the 2.5 version of the OpenACC API specification.

Penguin Computing Looks to Cavium ThunderX for ARM HPC Servers

Today Penguin Computing announced first customer shipments of its Tundra Extreme Scale (ES) server based on Cavium’s 48 core ARMv8 based ThunderX workload optimized processors. Tundra ES Valkre servers are now available for public order and a standard 19” rack mount version will ship in early 2016.

Video: Parallella – The Most Energy Efficient Supercomputer on the Planet

“Supercomputing should be available for everyone who wants it. With that mission in mind, a team of engineers created Parallella, an 18-core supercomputer that’s a little bigger than a credit card. Parallella is open source hardware; the circuit diagrams are on GitHub and the machine runs Linux. Icing on the cake: Parallella is the most energy efficient computer on the planet, and you can buy one for a hundred bucks. Why does parallel computing matter? How can developers use parallel computing to deliver better results for clients? Let’s explore these questions together.”