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Simulations of Hydrogen Ingestion Flashes in Giant Stars

“My team at the University of Minnesota has been collaborating with the team of Falk Herwig at the University of Victoria to simulate brief events in the lives of stars that can greatly affect the heavy elements they synthesize in their interiors and subsequently expel into the interstellar medium. These events are caused by the ingestion of highly combustible hydrogen-rich fuel into the convection zone above a helium burning shell in the deeper interior. Although these events are brief, it can take millions of time steps to simulate the dynamics in sufficient detail to capture subtle aspects of the hydrogen ingestion. To address the computational challenge, we exploit modern multicore and many-core processors and also scale the simulations to run efficiently on over 13,000 nodes of NSF’s Blue Waters machine at NCSA.”

Seeking Students and Instructors for the Blue Waters Intro to HPC Virtual Course

The Blue Waters project at the University of Illinois is offering a new graduate course entitled Introduction to High Performance Computing. The course will be offered as a collaborative, online course for multiple participating institutions fall semester 2016. “The project is seeking university partners that are interested in offering the course for credit to their students. The course includes online video lectures, quizzes, and homework assignments with access to free accounts on the Blue Waters system.”

Apply now for HPC Summer School & Blue Waters Graduate Program

Application deadlines are fast approaching for the Blue Waters Graduate Program and the International Summer School on HPC Challenges in Computational Sciences.

Solar Superstorms Documentary Powered by Blue Waters

A new high-resolution science documentary about the dynamics of the Sun will feature data-driven supercomputer visualizations produced by NCSA. Narrated by Benedict Cumberbach, Solar Superstorms debuts June 30 at the Louisiana Art & Science Museum in Baton Rouge before heading out to more than a dozen planetariums and science centers around the world.

Simulating Geomagnetic Storm Effects on Power Grids

“Using Blue Waters, we are for the first time running highly detailed, global simulations of the Earth-ionosphere waveguide under the effect of a geomagnetic storm. Disturbed ionospheric currents are modeled in a three-dimensional Maxwell’s equations finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) model extending from -400 km to an altitude of 400 km.”

STAR-CCM+ Scales to 102,000 Cores on Blue Waters

NCSA recently announced a new world record by scaling CD-adapco’s flagship simulation tool STAR-CCM+ to 102,000 cores on the Blue Waters supercomputer.

Podcast: Cray’s Steve Scott on Programming for the Next Decade

“Our computing systems continue to evolve, providing significant challenges to the programming teams managing large, long-lived projects. Issues include rapidly increasing on-node parallelism, varying forms of heterogeneity, deepening memory hierarchies, growing concerns around resiliency and silent data corruption, and worsening storage bottlenecks.”

Podcast: Satoshi Matsuoka on the Convergence of HPC and Big Data

“Rapid growth in the use cases and demands for extreme computing and huge data processing is leading to convergence of the two infrastructures. The trend towards convergence is not only strategic however but rather inevitable as the Moore’s law ends such that sustained growth in data capabilities, not compute, will advance the capacity and thus the overall capacities towards accelerating research and ultimately the industry.”

Attacking HIV with Titan and Blue Waters

“The highly parallel molecular dynamics code NAMD was was one of the first codes to run on a GPU cluster when G80 and CUDA were introduced in 2007, and is now used to perform petascale biomolecular simulations, including a 64-million-atom model of the HIV virus capsid, on the GPU-accelerated Cray XK7 Blue Waters and ORNL Titan machines.”

Supercomputing Black Hole Mergers with Blue Waters

“The mathematics involved in simulating these events is very sophisticated because one has to solve the equations of Einstein’s general relativity and magneto-hydrodynamics all together. The problem also requires very advanced supercomputers running programs on tens of thousands of CPUs simultaneously, and the use of sophisticated techniques for data extraction and visualization. Petascale numerical simulation is therefore the only tool available to accurately model these systems.”