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Cheyenne Supercomputer Triples Scientific Capability at NCAR

The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) is launching operations this month of one of the world’s most powerful and energy-efficient supercomputers, providing the nation with a major new tool to advance understanding of the atmospheric and related Earth system sciences. Named “Cheyenne,” the 5.34-petaflop system is capable of more than triple the amount of scientific computing performed by the previous NCAR supercomputer, Yellowstone. It also is three times more energy efficient.

Video: Introduction to the Cheyenne Supercomputer

Cheyenne is a new 5.34-petaflops, high-performance computer built for NCAR by SGI. Cheyenne be a critical tool for researchers across the country studying climate change, severe weather, geomagnetic storms, seismic activity, air quality, wildfires, and other important geoscience topics. In this video, Brian Vanderwende from UCAR describes typical workflows in the NCAR/CISL Cheyenne HPC environment as well as performance […]

Cheyenne – NCAR’s Next-Gen Data-Centric Supercomputer

In this video, Dave Hart, CISL User Services Manager presents: Cheyenne – NCAR’s Next-Generation Data-Centric Supercomputing Environment. “Cheyenne is a new 5.34-petaflops, high-performance computer built for NCAR by SGI. The hardware was delivered on Monday, September 12, at the NCAR-Wyoming Supercomputing Center (NWSC) and the system is on schedule to become operational at the beginning of 2017. All of the compute racks were powered up and nodes booted up within a few days of delivery.”

SGI and ANSYS Achieve New World Record in HPC

Over at the ANSYS Blog, Tony DeVarco writes that the company worked with SGI to break a world record for HPC scalability. “Breaking last year’s 129,024 core record by more than 16,000 cores, SGI was able to run the ANSYS provided 830 million cell gas combustor model from 1,296 to 145,152 CPU cores.This reduces the total solver wall clock time to run a single simulation from 20 minutes for 1,296 cores to a mere 13 seconds using 145,152 cores and achieving an overall scaling efficiency of 83%.”

DDN Storage Enables NCAR to Advance Weather and Climate Science

Today DDN announced that the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) has selected DDN’s new SFA14K high-performance hyper-converged storage platform to drive the performance and deliver the capacity needed for scientific breakthroughs in climate, weather and atmospheric-related science to power its Cheyenne supercomputer. “Having a centralized, large-scale storage resource delivers a real benefit to our scientists,” said Anke Kamrath, director of the operations and services division at NCAR’s computing lab. “With the new system, we have a balance between capacity and performance so that researchers will be able to start looking at the model output immediately without having to move data around. Now, they’ll be able to get right down to the work of analyzing the results and figuring out what the models reveal.”

NCAR Selects SGI Supercomputer for Advanced Modeling and Research

Today the National Center for Atmospheric Research announced that it has selected SGI to build one of the world’s most advanced compute systems used to develop models for predicting the impact of climate change and severe weather events on both a global and local scale. As part of a new procurement coming online in 2017, an SGI ICE XA system named “Cheyenne” will perform some of the world’s most data intensive calculations for weather and climate modeling to improve the resolution and precision by orders of magnitude. As a result, NCAR’s scientists will provide more actionable projections about the impact of climate change for specific regions and assist agencies throughout the world develop more accurate weather predictions on a local and global scale.