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Paul Messina Presents: A Path to Capable Exascale Computing

Paul Messina presented this talk at the 2016 Argonne Training Program on Extreme-Scale Computing. The U.S. Department of Energy has been charged with carrying out that role in an initiative called the Exascale Computing Project (ECP). Messina has been tapped to lead the project, heading a team with representation from the six major participating DOE national laboratories: Argonne, Los Alamos, Lawrence Berkeley, Lawrence Livermore, Oak Ridge and Sandia. The project program office is located at Oak Ridge.

DOE Funds 13 HPC4Mfg Clean Energy Projects

The Department of Energy has funded $3.8 million fro 13 new industry projects as part of its HPC4Mfg program. “We’re excited about this second round of projects because companies are bringing forward challenges that we can help address, which result in advancing innovation in U.S. manufacturing and increasing our economic competitiveness,” said LLNL mathematician Peg Folta, the director of the HPC4Mfg Program.

DOE to Invest $16 Million in Supercomputing Materials

Today the U.S. Department of Energy announced that it will invest $16 million over the next four years to accelerate the design of new materials through use of supercomputers. “Our simulations will rely on current petascale and future exascale capabilities at DOE supercomputing centers. To validate the predictions about material behavior, we’ll conduct experiments and use the facilities of the Advanced Photon Source, Spallation Neutron Source and the Nanoscale Science Research Centers.”

Video: How the HPC Environment is Different from the Desktop (and Why)

“High performance computing has transformed how science and engineering research is conducted. Answering a question in 30 minutes that used to take 6 months can quickly change the way one asks questions. Large computing facilities provide access to some of the world’s largest computing, data, and network resources in the world. Indeed, the DOE complex has the highest concentration of supercomputing capability in the world. However, by nature of their existence, making use of the largest computers in the world can be a challenging and unique task. This talk will discuss how supercomputers are unique and explain how that impacts their use.”

Supercomputing Better Engines at Argonne

Researchers are using Argonne supercomputers to jump-start internal-combustion engine designs in the name of conservation. “Improving engine efficiencies by even a few percentage points can take a big chunk out of our carbon footprint. We are working on a proof-of-concept to demonstrate how simulating several thousand engine configurations simultaneously can really help engineers zero in on the optimum engine designs and operating strategies to maximize efficiency while minimizing harmful emissions.”

Call for Proposals: Aurora Early Science Program at Argonne

The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) is now accepting proposals for its Aurora Early Science Program (ESP) through September 2, 2016. The program will award computing time to 10 science teams to pursue innovative research as part of pre-production testing on the facility’s next-generation system. Aurora is a massively parallel, many-core Intel-Cray supercomputer that will deliver 18 times the computational performance of Mira, ALCF’s current production system.

DOE Awards 1.7 Billion Core-hours on Argonne Supercomputers

The ASCR Leadership Computing Challenge (ALCC) has awarded 26 projects a total of 1.7 billion core-hours at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF), a DOE Office of Science User Facility. The one-year awards began July 1.

ESnet Timeline Celebrates 30 Years of Servicing Science

The Department of Energy’s Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) has published a 3D timeline celebrating thirty years of service. With the launch of an interactive timeline, viewers can explore ESnet’s history and contributions.

Supercomputers Joining the Fight Against Cancer

“Supercomputers are key to the Cancer Moonshot. These exceptionally high-powered machines have the potential to greatly accelerate the development of cancer therapies by finding patterns in massive datasets too large for human analysis. Supercomputers can help us better understand the complexity of cancer development, identify novel and effective treatments, and help elucidate patterns in vast and complex data sets that advance our understanding of cancer.”

Paul Messina on the New ECP Exascale Computing Project

Argonne Distinguished Fellow Paul Messina has been tapped to lead the Exascale Computing Project, heading a team with representation from the six major participating DOE national laboratories: Argonne, Los Alamos, Lawrence Berkeley, Lawrence Livermore, Oak Ridge and Sandia. The project will focus its efforts on four areas: Applications, Software, Hardware, and Exascale Systems.