MailChimp Developer

Sign up for our newsletter and get the latest HPC news and analysis.
Send me information from insideHPC:


Kick the Tires on Quantum Computing with the IBM Cloud

In its latest move to build a practical quantum computer, IBM Research for the first time ever is making quantum computing available in the cloud to anyone interested in hands-on access to the company’s advanced experimental quantum system. “The cloud-enabled quantum computing platform, called IBM Quantum Experience, will allow users to run algorithms and experiments on IBM’s quantum processor, work with the individual quantum bits (qubits), and explore tutorials and simulations around what might be possible with quantum computing.”

Driving Innovation at the Hartree Centre with the OpenPOWER Architecture

In this video from the OpenPOWER Summit, Dr. Mike Ashworth from the STFC Hartree Centre presents: Driving Innovation at the Hartree Centre with the OpenPOWER Architecture. “The STFC Hartree Centre has been established with a focus on economic impact through our collaborations with UK industry, offering access to HPC and data intensive systems, code development expertise and collaborative research opportunities. Through a major partnership with IBM we have been porting and evaluating our key application codes on the OpenPOWER architecture seeking to leverage performance and productivity gains for the benefit of our key customers. We will describe progress in porting and optimization of applications from a range of science areas.”

Slidecast: Getting Started with HPC using the New IBM Platform LSF Suites

In this slidecast, Gabor Samu from IBM describes the newly available IBM Platform LSF Suites for Workgroup and HPC. Designed to make it much easier to “kick the tires” on LSF, the new suites can help you configure install, maintain, and job manage HPC clusters with a single download. “The new IBM Platform LSF Suites are packages that include more than IBM Platform LSF, they provide additional functionalities designed to simplify HPC for users, administrators and the IT organization.”

Ohio Supercomputer Center Names New Cluster after Jesse Owens

The Ohio Supercomputer Center has named its newest HPC cluster after Olympic champion Jesse Owens. The new Owens Cluster will be powered by Dell PowerEdge servers featuring the new Intel Xeon processor E5-2600 v4 product family, include storage components manufactured by DDN, and utilize interconnects provided by Mellanox. “Our newest supercomputer system is the most powerful that the Center has ever run,” ODHE Chancellor John Carey said in a recent letter to Owens’ daughters. “As such, I thought it fitting to name it for your father, who symbolizes speed, integrity and, most significantly for me, compassion as embodied by his tireless work to help youths overcome obstacles to their future success. As a first-generation college graduate, I can relate personally to the value of mentors in the lives of those students.”

Distinguished Speaker Series Coming to ISC 2016

Today ISC 2016 announced that five renowned experts in computational science will participate in their new Distinguished Speaker series. Topics will include exascale computing efforts in the US, the next supercomputers in development in Japan and China, cognitive computing advancements at IBM, and quantum computing research at NASA.

University of Michigan Looks to OpenPOWER for HPC

The University of Michigan is collaborating with IBM to develop and deliver “data-centric” supercomputing systems designed to increase the pace of scientific discovery in fields as diverse as aircraft and rocket engine design, cardiovascular disease treatment, materials physics, climate modeling and cosmology. “Scientific research is now at the crossroads of big data and high performance computing,” said Sumit Gupta, vice president, high performance computing and data analytics, IBM. “The explosion of data requires systems and infrastructures based on POWER8 plus accelerators that can both stream and manage the data and quickly synthesize and make sense of data to enable faster insights.”

Penguin Computing Accelerates OpenPOWER-based Magna Servers

Today Penguin Computing announced Open Compute Project (OCP)-based systems that reinforce both its continued collaboration with NVIDIA and new options in Penguin Computing’s Magna family of OpenPOWER-based servers. “Customers benefit when we partner with exceptional organizations like NVIDIA, the OpenPOWER Foundation and Open Compute Foundation in developing our systems,” said Jussi Kukkonen, Director Product Management, Penguin Computing. “An essential part of our mission is to provide customers with form factor flexibility, choice of architecture and peak performance, which are all hallmarks of Penguin Computing.”

Video: OpenPOWER Roadmap Toward CORAL

“Last year IBM together with partners out of the OpenPOWER foundation won two of the multi-year contacts of the US CORAL program. Within these contracts IBM develops an accelerated HPC infrastructure and software development ecosystem that will be a major step towards Exascale Computing. We believe that the CORAL roadmap will enable a massive pull for transformation of HPC codes for accelerated systems. The talk will discuss the IBM HPC strategy, explain the OpenPOWER foundation and the show IBM OpenPOWER roadmap for CORAL and beyond.”

TYAN to Showcase 4U, 4x GPU Platform at GTC 2016

The FT76-B7922 is the first multi-purpose server platform that simultaneously supports scale-up (fat node) and scale-out (many-core CPU node). With 1:1 CPU to GPU ratio, TYAN’s FT76-B7922 provides a high price/performance and performance/watt for HPC community that both needs CPU and GPU intensive computing workloads” said Albert Mu, Vice President of MITAC Computing Technology Corporation’s TYAN Business Unit.

Panel Discussion on Exascale Computing

In this video from the 2016 HPC Advisory Council Switzerland Conference, Addison Snell from Intersect360 Research moderates a panel discussion on Exascale computing. “Exascale computing will uniquely provide knowledge leading to transformative advances for our economy, security and society in general. A failure to proceed with appropriate speed risks losing competitiveness in information technology, in our industrial base writ large, and in leading-edge science.”