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Supercomputing the Black Hole Speed Limit

Supermassive black holes have a speed limit that governs how fast and how large they can grow,” said Joseph Smidt of the Theoretical Design Division at LANL. Using computer codes developed at Los Alamos for modeling the interaction of matter and radiation related to the Lab’s stockpile stewardship mission, Smidt and colleagues created a simulation of collapsing stars that resulted in supermassive black holes forming in less time than expected, cosmologically speaking, in the first billion years of the universe.

LANL Donates Supercomputer to University of New Mexico

Los Alamos National Laboratory has donated a decommissioned supercomputer to the University of New Mexico Center for Advanced Research Computing. The machine was acquired through the NSF-sponsored PR0bE project, which is run by the New Mexico Consortium.

Asetek Lands Nine Installations on the Green500

“As seen at installations included on both the Green500 and Top500 lists, Asetek’s distributed liquid cooling architecture enables cluster energy efficiency in addition to sustained and un-throttled cluster performance,” said John Hamill, Vice President of WW Sales and Marketing. “Around the world, data centers are increasingly using Asetek technology for High Performance Computing while reducing energy costs.”

Exascale Computing Project Announces $48 Million to Establish Four Exascale Co-Design Centers

Today the Department of Energy’s Exascale Computing Project (ECP) today announced that it has selected four co-design centers as part of a 4 year, $48 million funding award. The first year is funded at $12 million, and is to be allocated evenly among the four award recipients. “By targeting common patterns of computation and communication, known as “application motifs”, we are confident that these ECP co-design centers will knock down key performance barriers and pave the way for applications to exploit all that capable exascale has to offer.”

DOE to Showcase Leadership in HPC at SC16

Researchers and staff from the U.S. Department of Energy’s national laboratories will showcase some of DOE’s best computing and networking innovations and techniques at SC16 in Salt Lake City. “Computational scientists working for various DOE laboratories have been in involved in the conference since its 1988 beginnings, and this year’s event is no different. Experts from 14 national laboratories will be sharing a booth featuring speakers, presentations, demonstrations, discussions and simulations.”

MarFS – A Scalable Near-POSIX File System over Cloud Objects

Gary Grider from LANL presented this talk at the Storage Developer Conference. “MarFS is a Near-POSIX File System using cloud storage for data and many POSIX file systems for metadata. Extreme HPC environments require that MarFS scale a POSIX namespace metadata to trillions of files and billions of files in a single directory while storing the data in efficient massively parallel ways in industry standard erasure protected cloud style object stores.”

Funding Boosts Exascale Research at LANL

“Our collaborative role in these exascale applications projects stems from our laboratory’s long-term strategy in co-design and our appreciation of the vital role of high-performance computing to address national security challenges,” said John Sarrao, associate director for Theory, Simulation and Computation at Los Alamos National Laboratory. “The opportunity to take on these scientific explorations will be especially rewarding because of the strategic partnerships with our sister laboratories.”

The Challenges and Rewards of Stockpile Stewardship

Charles W. Nakhleh from LANL presented this talk at the 2016 DOE NNSA SSGF Annual Program Review. “This talk will explore some of the future opportunities and exciting scientific and technological challenges in the National Nuclear Security Administration Stockpile Stewardship Program. The program’s objective is to ensure that the nation’s nuclear deterrent remains safe, secure and effective. Meeting that objective requires sustained excellence in a variety of scientific and engineering disciplines and has led to remarkable advances in theory, experiment and simulation.”

Paul Messina Presents: A Path to Capable Exascale Computing

Paul Messina presented this talk at the 2016 Argonne Training Program on Extreme-Scale Computing. “The President’s NSCI initiative calls for the development of Exascale computing capabilities. The U.S. Department of Energy has been charged with carrying out that role in an initiative called the Exascale Computing Project (ECP). Messina has been tapped to lead the project, heading a team with representation from the six major participating DOE national laboratories: Argonne, Los Alamos, Lawrence Berkeley, Lawrence Livermore, Oak Ridge and Sandia. The project program office is located at Oak Ridge.

Trinity Supercomputer Wiring Reconfiguration Saves Millions

LANL reports that a moment of inspiration during a wiring diagram review has saved more than $2 million in material and labor costs for the Trinity supercomputer at Los Alamos National Laboratory.