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Panel Discussion: The Exascale Endeavor

Gilad Shainer moderated this panel discussion on Exascale Computing at the Stanford HPC Conference. “The creation of a capable exascale ecosystem will have profound effects on the lives of Americans, improving our nation’s national security, economic competitiveness, and scientific capabilities. The exponential increase of computation power enabled with exascale will fuel a vast range of breakthroughs and accelerate discoveries in national security, medicine, earth sciences and many other fields.”

Video: Singularity – Containers for Science, Reproducibility, and HPC

“Explore how Singularity liberates non-privileged users and host resources (such as interconnects, resource managers, file systems, accelerators …) allowing users to take full control to set-up and run in their native environments. This talk explores Singularity how it combines software packaging models with minimalistic containers to create very lightweight application bundles which can be simply executed and contained completely within their environment or be used to interact directly with the host file systems at native speeds. A Singularity application bundle can be as simple as containing a single binary application or as complicated as containing an entire workflow and is as flexible as you will need.”

Kathy Yelick Joins Alameda County Women’s Hall of Fame

Kathy Yelick, the Associate Lab Director for Computing Sciences at LBNL, has been named to the Alameda County Women’s Hall of Fame for her leadership in science, technology and engineering. Twelve women, each representing a different field, were named as 2017 inductees. “According the organization’s announcement, Yelick is being recognized as “an international leader in computational sciences and a leading force in applying high performance computing to efforts to develop alternative energy sources and combat climate change. She is an advocate for diversity in computer science education and the use of computing to solve societal challenges.”

Agenda Posted for Next Week’s HPC Advisory Council Stanford Conference

“Over two days we’ll delve into a wide range of interests and best practices – in applications, tools and techniques and share new insights on the trends, technologies and collaborative partnerships that foster this robust ecosystem. Designed to be highly interactive, the open forum will feature industry notables in keynotes, technical sessions, workshops and tutorials. These highly regarded subject matter experts (SME’s) will share their works and wisdom covering everything from established HPC disciplines to emerging usage models from old-school architectures and breakthrough applications to pioneering research and provocative results. Plus a healthy smattering of conversation and controversy on endeavors in Exascale, Big Data, Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and much much more!”

Supercomputing Sheds Light on Leaf Study

A new study led by a research scientist at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) highlights a literally shady practice in plant science that has in some cases underestimated plants’ rate of growth and photosynthesis, among other traits. “More standardized fieldwork, in parallel with new computational tools and theoretical work, will contribute to better global plant models,” Keenan said.

Precisely Tuned Data-Intensive Algorithms Ascend the Graph500

When the latest version of the Graph 500 list was released Nov. 16 at the SC16 conference, there were two new entries in the top 10, both contributed by Khaled Ibrahim of Berkeley Lab’s Computational Research Division. “Ibrahim explains that such workloads, known as communication-bound applications are typically the most difficult to scale on HPC systems. But finding a way to scale up their performance can have a big payoff by reducing the computational “expense,” or amount of computing time needed to solve a problem.”

SLAC & Berkeley Researchers Prepare for Exascale

Researchers at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are playing key roles in two recently funded computing projects with the goal of developing cutting-edge scientific applications for future exascale supercomputers that can perform at least a billion billion computing operations per second – 50 to 100 times more than the most powerful supercomputers in the world today.

Berkeley Lab to Develop Key Applications for ECP Exascale Computing Project

Today Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory announced that LBNL scientists will lead or play key roles in developing 11 critical research applications for next-generation supercomputers as part of DOE’s Exascale Computing Project (ECP).

Paul Messina Presents: A Path to Capable Exascale Computing

Paul Messina presented this talk at the 2016 Argonne Training Program on Extreme-Scale Computing. “The President’s NSCI initiative calls for the development of Exascale computing capabilities. The U.S. Department of Energy has been charged with carrying out that role in an initiative called the Exascale Computing Project (ECP). Messina has been tapped to lead the project, heading a team with representation from the six major participating DOE national laboratories: Argonne, Los Alamos, Lawrence Berkeley, Lawrence Livermore, Oak Ridge and Sandia. The project program office is located at Oak Ridge.

DOE to Invest $16 Million in Supercomputing Materials

Today the U.S. Department of Energy announced that it will invest $16 million over the next four years to accelerate the design of new materials through use of supercomputers. “Our simulations will rely on current petascale and future exascale capabilities at DOE supercomputing centers. To validate the predictions about material behavior, we’ll conduct experiments and use the facilities of the Advanced Photon Source, Spallation Neutron Source and the Nanoscale Science Research Centers.”