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SLAC & Berkeley Researchers Prepare for Exascale

Researchers at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are playing key roles in two recently funded computing projects with the goal of developing cutting-edge scientific applications for future exascale supercomputers that can perform at least a billion billion computing operations per second – 50 to 100 times more than the most powerful supercomputers in the world today.

Berkeley Lab to Develop Key Applications for ECP Exascale Computing Project

Today Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory announced that LBNL scientists will lead or play key roles in developing 11 critical research applications for next-generation supercomputers as part of DOE’s Exascale Computing Project (ECP).

Paul Messina Presents: A Path to Capable Exascale Computing

Paul Messina presented this talk at the 2016 Argonne Training Program on Extreme-Scale Computing. “The President’s NSCI initiative calls for the development of Exascale computing capabilities. The U.S. Department of Energy has been charged with carrying out that role in an initiative called the Exascale Computing Project (ECP). Messina has been tapped to lead the project, heading a team with representation from the six major participating DOE national laboratories: Argonne, Los Alamos, Lawrence Berkeley, Lawrence Livermore, Oak Ridge and Sandia. The project program office is located at Oak Ridge.

DOE to Invest $16 Million in Supercomputing Materials

Today the U.S. Department of Energy announced that it will invest $16 million over the next four years to accelerate the design of new materials through use of supercomputers. “Our simulations will rely on current petascale and future exascale capabilities at DOE supercomputing centers. To validate the predictions about material behavior, we’ll conduct experiments and use the facilities of the Advanced Photon Source, Spallation Neutron Source and the Nanoscale Science Research Centers.”

Interview: PDSW-DISCS’16 Workshop to Focus on Data-Intensive Computing at SC16

The first Joint International Workshop on Parallel Data Storage and Data Intensive Scalable Computing Systems (PDSW-DISCS’16) has issued its Call for Papers. As a one day event held in conjunction with SC16, the workshop will combine two overlapping communities to to address some of the most critical challenges for scientific data storage, management, devices, and processing infrastructure. To learn more, we caught up with workshop co-chairs Dean Hildebrand (IBM) and Shane Canon (LBNL).

WHPC Panel Looks at Diversity in the Workplace

In this video from the Women in HPC Workshop at ISC 2016, Kim McMahon moderates a panel discussion on Diversity in the Workplace. The panel will discuss methods that to improve workplace diversity, the challenges, successes and pitfalls they have experienced.

Materials Lab at LBNL Releases Battery and Molecule Data to Public

The Materials Project has enabled some of the most exciting research in my group,” said Morgan, who also serves on the Materials Project’s advisory board. “By providing easy access to a huge database, as well as tools to process that data for thermodynamic predictions, the Materials Project has enabled my group to rapidly take on materials design projects that would have been prohibitive just a few years ago.”

X-Stack PI Meeting Showcases Exascale Code

Berkeley Lab recently hosted the fourth annual X-Stack PI event, where X-Stack researchers, facilities teams, application scientists, and developers from national labs, universities, and industry met to share the latest developments in X-Stack application codes. “X-Stack was launched in 2012 by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Scientific Computing Research program to support the development of exascale software tools, including programming languages and libraries, compilers and runtime systems, that will help programmers handle massive parallelism, data movement, heterogeneity and failures as the scientific community transitions to the next generation of extreme-scale supercomputers.”

Video: Panel Discussion on Exascale Computing

In this video from the 2016 Stanford HPC Conference, Gilad Shainer from the HPC Advisory Council moderates a panel discussion on Exascale Computing. “Exascale computing will uniquely provide knowledge leading to transformative advances for our economy, security and society in general. A failure to proceed with appropriate speed risks losing competitiveness in information technology, in our industrial base writ large, and in leading-edge science.”

Video: Node Health Check (NHC) Project Update

In this video from the 2016 Stanford HPC Conference, Michael Jennings from LBNL presents: Node Health Check (NHC) Project Update. “In this follow-up to his 2014 presentation at the Stanford HPCAC Conference, Michael will provide an update on the latest happenings with the LBNL NHC project, new features in the latest release, and a brief overview of the roadmap for future development.”