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X-Stack PI Meeting Showcases Exascale Code

Berkeley Lab recently hosted the fourth annual X-Stack PI event, where X-Stack researchers, facilities teams, application scientists, and developers from national labs, universities, and industry met to share the latest developments in X-Stack application codes. “X-Stack was launched in 2012 by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Scientific Computing Research program to support the development of exascale software tools, including programming languages and libraries, compilers and runtime systems, that will help programmers handle massive parallelism, data movement, heterogeneity and failures as the scientific community transitions to the next generation of extreme-scale supercomputers.”

IBM & LLNL Collaborate on TrueNorth Neuromorphic Computing

Today Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) announced it has purchased a first-of-a-kind brain-inspired supercomputing platform for deep learning inference developed by IBM Research. Based on a breakthrough neurosynaptic computer chip called IBM TrueNorth, the scalable platform will process the equivalent of 16 million neurons and 4 billion synapses and consume the energy equivalent of a tablet computer – a mere 2.5 watts of power for the 16 TrueNorth chips. The brain-like, neural network design of the IBM Neuromorphic System is able to infer complex cognitive tasks such as pattern recognition and integrated sensory processing far more efficiently than conventional chips.

Video: The Road to the Sierra/Coral Supercomputer

“As it readies for Sierra, a new IBM-based platform, LLNL is not only defining the metrics as it paves the road to Coral, it is taking the first giant steps on the path toward Exascale. This talk will provide an overview of Coral and reveal the plans and progress to evolve applications for Sierra and future large-scale systems.”

Exascale Architectures: Evolution or Revolution?

In this special guest feature, Earl Joseph from IDC describes his SC15 panel where four HPC luminaries discussed, disputed, and divined the path to exascale computing. “As the panel wound to a close, participants agreed on one thing: the path to exascale contains significant obstacles, but they’re not insurmountable. Tremendous progress is being made in preparing codes for the next generations of systems, and sheer determination and innovation is running at an all-time high.”

AweSim Project at OSC to Advance Welding Simulation with HPC4Mfg

Today the AweSim program at the Ohio Supercomputer Center announced it has been selected to develop one of 10 national industry projects under the DOE High Performance Computing for Manufacturing (HPC4Mfg) program. We are pleased to be working with AweSim to develop a cloud-based 3D platform for our E-Weld Predictor tool,” said Tom McGaughy, EWI Director of Technology. “This new app will increase the accuracy of weld distortion and residual stress predictions and broaden access for manufacturers to use this advanced simulation tool to reduce rework and improve first-time quality.”

GE & DOE Partner on HPC4Mfg Projects

Today GE Global Research announced that it has been awarded two projects under the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) High Performance Computing for Manufacturing (HPC4Mfg) Program. Teams of Global Research experts will work with teams at Oak Ridge and Lawrence Livermore National Labs on some of the world’s most powerful supercomputers to improve 3D printing processes and explore new concepts for higher jet engine efficiency.

10 New HPC Projects to Advance U.S. Manufacturing & Energy Technology

Today U.S. Department of Energy’s announced 10 new High Performance Computing for Manufacturing (HPC4Mfg) projects. Under the HPC4Mfg program, National laboratory experts in advanced modeling, simulation and data analysis collaborate with industrial partners on project teams to address manufacturing challenges that will aid in decision making, optimize processes and design, improve quality, predict performance and failure, quicken or eliminate testing, and/or shorten the time of adoption of new technologies.

Dona Crawford Retires from LLNL

Dona Crawford, Associate Director for Computation at NNSA’s Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), announced her retirement last week after 15 years of leading Livermore’s Computation Directorate. “Dona has successfully led a multidisciplinary 1000-person team that develops and deploys world-class supercomputers, computational science, and information technology expertise that enable the Laboratory’s national security programs,” LLNL Director Bill Goldstein said. “Dona’s leadership in high performance computing has been instrumental in bringing a series of world-class machines to the Laboratory.”

Who Will Write Next-generation Software?

In this special guest feature from Scientific Computing World, Robert Roe writes that software scalability and portability may be more important even than energy efficiency to the future of HPC. “As the HPC market searches for the optimal strategy to reach exascale, it is clear that the major roadblock to improving the performance of applications will be the scalability of software, rather than the hardware configuration – or even the energy costs associated with running the system.”

With APEX, National Labs Collaborate to Develop Next-Gen Supercomputers

Today Los Alamos, Lawrence Berkeley, and Sandia national laboratories announced the Alliance for Application Performance at Extreme Scale (APEX). The new collaboration will focus on the design, acquisition and deployment of future advanced technology high performance computing systems.