MailChimp Developer

Sign up for our newsletter and get the latest HPC news and analysis.
Send me information from insideHPC:


Tutorial: GPU Performance Nuggets

In this video from the 2016 Blue Waters Symposium, GPU Performance Nuggets – Carl Pearson and Simon Garcia De Gonzalo from the University of Illinois present: GPU Performance Nuggets. “In this talk, we introduce a pair of Nvidia performance tools available on Blue Waters. We discuss what the GPU memory hierarchy provides for your application. We then present a case study that explores if memory hierarchy optimization can go too far.”

OpenPOWER for HPC Workshop Coming to ISC 2016

Editor’s Note: The OpenPOWER European Summit has been officially postponed until later in 2016, but don’t miss the International Workshop on OpenPOWER for HPC on June 23 at ISC 2016.  The OpenPOWER Foundation was established as a non-profit consortium to give its members the ability to innovate software/hardware solutions based on the POWER architecture. About half of […]

OpenACC Building Momentum going into GTC

Today the OpenACC standards group announced a set of additional hackathons and a broad range of learning opportunities taking place during the upcoming GPU Technology Conference being held in San Jose, CA April 4-7, 2016. OpenACC is a mature and performance-portable path for developing scalable parallel programs across multi-core CPUs, GPU accelerators or many-core processors.

2016 Hackathons Seeking Team Applications

“The goal of each hackathon is for current or prospective user groups of large hybrid CPU-GPU systems to send teams of at least 3 developers along with either (1) a (potentially) scalable application that needs to be ported to GPU accelerators, or (2) an application running on accelerators which needs optimization. There will be intensive mentoring during this 5-day hands-on workshop, with the goal that the teams leave with applications running on GPUs, or at least with a clear roadmap of how to get there. Our mentors come from national laboratories, universities and vendors, and besides having extensive experience in programming with OpenACC/CUDA, many of them develop the GPU-capable compilers and help define the OpenACC standard.”

Who Will Write Next-generation Software?

In this special guest feature from Scientific Computing World, Robert Roe writes that software scalability and portability may be more important even than energy efficiency to the future of HPC. “As the HPC market searches for the optimal strategy to reach exascale, it is clear that the major roadblock to improving the performance of applications will be the scalability of software, rather than the hardware configuration – or even the energy costs associated with running the system.”

OpenACC 2.5 Includes Support for ARM and x86 Processors

The OpenACC Standards Group released the 2.5 version of the OpenACC API specification.

PGI Accelerator Compilers Add OpenACC Support for x86

“Our goal is to enable HPC developers to easily port applications across all major CPU and accelerator platforms with uniformly high performance using a common source code base,” said Douglas Miles, director of PGI Compilers & Tools at NVIDIA. “This capability will be particularly important in the race towards exascale computing in which there will be a variety of system architectures requiring a more flexible application programming approach.”

Satoshi Matsuoka to Keynote Workshop on Directives and Tools for Accelerators

The Center for Advanced Computing systems has announced their agenda for the Directives and Tools for Accelerators Workshop. Also known as the Seismic Programming Shift Workshop, the event takes place Oct. 11-13 at the University of Houston.

Training the Next Generation of Code Developers for HPC

This is the first article in a two-part series by Rob Farber about the challenges facing the HPC community in training people to write code and develop algorithms for current and future, massively-parallel, massive-scale HPC systems.

Users Accelerate their Own Code at EuroHack

“Despite what the name “EuroHack” may lead people to believe, no external systems were hacked during the EuroHack workshop in Lugano. In actual fact, the aim of the event was for experts to design computer codes that would exploit computer architectures more efficiently.”