Sign up for our newsletter and get the latest HPC news and analysis.
Send me information from insideHPC:


Video: Computing of the Future

Jeffrey Welser from IBM Research Almaden presented this talk at the Stanford HPC Conference. “Whether exploring new technical capabilities, collaborating on ethical practices or applying Watson technology to cancer research, financial decision-making, oil exploration or educational toys, IBM Research is shaping the future of AI.”

IBM Unveils Project DataWorks for AI-Powered Decision-Making

“We are at an inflection point in the big data era,” said Bob Picciano, senior vice president, IBM Analytics. “We know that users spend up to 80 percent of their time on data preparation, no matter the task, even when they are applying the most sophisticated AI. Project DataWorks helps transform this challenge by bringing together all data sources on one common platform, enabling users to get the data ready for insight and action, faster than ever before.”

Video: Will AI & Robotics Make Humans Obsolete?

“IBM has developed new scale-up and scale-out systems — with 16 million neurons — that will be presented in Dr Modha’s pioneering research talk. Watson wins at Jeopardy and enters industrial applications while AlphaGo defeats the human Go champion. No day goes by before the dooms day prediction of AI infused Robots taking over our world comes up in the news. Visions of HAL and Terminator coming alive? Will Artificial Intelligence make us obsolete?”

Watson for President Foundation Explores AI as Commander-in-Chief

If the current set of Presidential candidates has you down, the Watson for President Foundation may just have an answer for you. As an independent organization not affiliated with Watson’s creator, IBM, the foundation contends that the artificial intelligence technology that won Jeopardy! would be well-suited to be the leader of the free world.

Video: IBM Panel Discussion on Machine Learning

In this video, Dr. Michael Karasick from IBM moderates a panel discussion on Machine Learning. “The success of cognitive computing will not be measured by Turing tests or a computer’s ability to mimic humans. It will be measured in more practical ways, like return on investment, new market opportunities, diseases cured and lives saved.”