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Commercial Grade Lustre File Systems

commercial grade lustre sm

With the release of Intel Enterprise Edition (EE) for Lustre software, commercial customers have an opportunity to employ a production-ready version of Lustre optimized for business HPDA. Intel EE for Lustre includes the open source distribution of Lustre with the latest features, fully tested and supported by Intel, a major collaborator in the development of the Lustre parallel file system.

OrangeFS – It Just Works

OrangeFS logo

OrangeFS, the user-friendly, open source parallel file system for high performance computing, has a lot of endearing qualities. Heading up the list is the fact that it just works – download it to your existing commodity hardware and realize immediate and substantial boosts in the performance of your HPC and storage clusters.

Enterprise Catches the HPC Tools Bug

logo-allinea

Recent announcements, analyst reports, conferences and anecdotal evidence point to a certain upswing for high performance computing in industry. Many industries have reaped the benefit of HPC for considerable time and are now stepping up a gear with their systems – some even on a par with national facilities, in order to maintain or extend their advantage. Whether in upstream exploration, engine design or aerodynamics – if you can scale up or scale out, you can derive advantage.

Interview: Powering up Vectorization with Intel Parallel Studio XE 2015

james

“The thing that really excites me is looking at OpenMP 4.0. We’ve got virtually a complete set of 4.0 features. OpenMP 4.0 brings together tasking, which it’s had since its start in ’97, with new capabilities for vectorization and for offload. Bringing those together, and being able to do them at the same time, is extraordinarily powerful. I love teaching classes about it and seeing what people can do with it. And now it’s fully supported in our products.”

October Workshop to Celebrate 20 Years of Beowulf

Thomas Sterling

The CREST Center for Research in Extreme Scale Technologies is hosting the 20 Years of Beowulf workshop in Annapolis, MD. on Oct. 13-14. “The initial target of the Beowulf cluster project was to develop inexpensive, smaller parallel computing platforms—to bring supercomputing to the masses. The approach was extremely successful and Beowulf/commodity clusters are being used worldwide across a diverse spectrum of uses from teams of high school students to some the world’s most powerful supercomputers.”

HPC Virtualization and Secure Private Cloud

secure cloud

This article is the third in an editorial series that explores the benefits the HPC community can achieve by adopting HPC virtualization and secure private cloud technologies. Virtualization has been proven to be a viable architectural approach that addresses the many challenges mentioned in last week’s article. This week and next we look at the benefits of creating a virtualized infrastructure.

Supercomputing 101: A History of Platform Evolution and Future Trends

Rob Neely

This talk gives a history of the various eras of High Performance Computing as defined by the dominant platforms, starting with mainframes and continuing through vector architectures, massively parallel architectures, and the current emerging trends that will define the upcoming exascale era.

NERSC Leads Next-Generation Code Optimization Effort

NERSClogocolor

“We are excited about launching NESAP in partnership with Cray and Intel to help transition our broad user base to energy-efficient architectures,” said Sudip Dosanjh, director of NERSC, the primary HPC facility for the DOE’s Office of Science. “We expect to see many aspects of Cori in an exascale computer, including dramatically more concurrency and on-package memory. The response from our users has been overwhelming—they recognize that Cori will allow them to do science that can’t be done on today’s supercomputers.”

Is Light-speed Computing Only Months Away?

light

In this video, Professor Heinz Wolff explains the Optalysys Optical Processor. The Cambridge UK based startup announced today that the company is only months away from launching a prototype optical processor with “the potential to deliver Exascale levels of processing power on a standard-sized desktop computer.”

New Approaches to Energy Efficient Exascale

deep

“As displayed at ISC’14, DEEP combines a standard InfiniBand cluster of Intel Xeon nodes, with a new, highly scalable ‘booster’ consisting of Phi co-processors and a high-performance 3D torus network from Extoll, the German interconnect company spun out of the University of Heidelberg.”