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Radio Free Looks at Exascale Application Challenges in the Wake of XSEDE 2.0 Funding

In this podcast, the Radio Free HPC team discusses the recent news that Intel has sold its controlling stake in McAfee and that NSF has funded the next generation of XSEDE.

NSF Awards $110 Million for XSEDE 2.0

Today, the National Science Foundation (NSF) announced a $110 million award to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and 18 partner institutions to continue and expand activities undertaken through the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE).

Podcast: Supercomputing Better Soybeans

In this TACC Podcast, Researchers describe how XSEDE supercomputing resources are helping them grow a better soybean through the SoyKB project based from the University of Missouri-Columbia. “The way resequencing is conducted is to chop the genome in many small pieces and see the many, many combinations of small pieces,” said Xu. “The data are huge, millions of fragments mapped to a reference. That’s actually a very time consuming process. Resequencing data analysis takes most of our computing time on XSEDE.”

International HPC Summer School Prepares Next Generation

XSEDE reports that this year’s International Summer School on HPC Challenges in Computational Sciences was a rousing success. “This program is an excellent mix of high performance computing knowledge and meeting international people involved in the field. There are a lot of training programs in the USA, but very few of them combine it with interaction of international colleagues and immersion in another culture.”

Register Now for HPC Workflow Workshops

Registration is now open for a free Workflows Workshop to be held August 9-10 at multiple institutions across the country. Sponsored by the Blue Waters sustained-petascale computing project, this workshop will provide an overview of workflows and how they can enhance research productivity.

Supercomputing the Mystery of Astrophysical Jets

Over at NICS, Scott Gibson writes that researchers are using XSEDE supercomputing resources to simulate the gaseous outflows from black holes known as astrophysical jets. “These jets can affect galaxy formation and evolution by, for example, heating up the surroundings and suppressing star formation, expelling the surrounding gas and thereby reducing the mass supply to the black hole.”

XDMoD Tool to Measure Impact of Campus Cyberinfrastructure

Thanks to a grant from the National Science Foundation, Indiana University is developing an online service that will make it easier for university administrators to understand the importance of funding related to IT systems based at their institutions. The novel functionality will be available as a module for Open XDMoD (XD Metrics on Demand), which was developed by the University at Buffalo Center for Computational Research (CCR).

Combating the Spread of Disease with HPC

In this special guest feature, Lance Farrell writes that, in this era of global air travel, NSF-funded researchers are using supercomputers to equip policy makers with the evidence needed to make fast, accurate choices in the event of an epidemic.

Podcast: Supercomputing Gels with Stampede

In this TACC Podcast, Jorge Salazar looks at how researchers are using the Stampede supercomputer to shed light on the microscale world of colloidal gels — liquids dispersed in a solid medium as a gel. “Colloidal gels are actually soft solids, but we can manipulate their structure to produce ‘on-demand’ transitions from liquid-like to solid-like behavior that can be reversed many times,” Zia said. Zia is an Assistant Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Cornell University.

Supercomputing the Mystery of Old Faithful

Over at Science Node, Lance Farrell writes that researchers are using XSEDE supercomputer resources to solve the mysteries of the Old Faithful geyser. “If you look at the distribution of supervolcanoes globally, you’ll find something very interesting. You will see that most if not all of them are sitting close to a subduction zone,” Liu observes. “This close vicinity made me wonder if there were any internal relations between them, and I thought it was necessary and intriguing to further investigate this.”