Sign up for our newsletter and get the latest HPC news and analysis.
Send me information from insideHPC:


Video: Quantum Computing and Supercomputing, AI, Blockchain

Shahin Khan from OrionX.net gave this talk at the Washington Quantum Computing Meetup. “A whole new approach to computing (as in, not binary any more), quantum computing is as promising as it is unproven. Quantum computing goes beyond Moore’s law since every quantum bit (qubit) doubles the computational power, similar to the famous wheat and chessboard problem. So the payoff is huge, even though it is, for now, expensive, unproven, and difficult to use. But new players will become more visible, early use cases and gaps will become better defined, new use cases will be identified, and a short stack will emerge to ease programming.”

DARPA Grant to Foster Practical Quantum Computing with Rigetti

Today Rigetti Computing announced the company has been awarded up to $8.6 million from DARPA to develop a full-stack system with proven quantum advantage for solving real world problems. “We believe strongly in an integrated hardware and software approach, which is why we’re bringing together the scalable Rigetti chip architecture with the algorithm design and optimization techniques pioneered by the NASA-USRA team.”

Ayar Labs, DARPA and Intel Replace Electronic I/O with Efficient Optical Signaling

Researchers from Intel and Ayar Labs working on PIPES have successfully replaced the traditional electrical input/output (I/O) of a state-of-the-art field programmable gate array (FPGA) with efficient optical signaling interfaces. The demonstration leverages an optical interface developed by Ayar Labs called TeraPHY, an optical I/O chiplet that replaces electrical serializer/deserializer (SERDES) chiplets. “FPGAs with photonic interfaces will have broad impact, improving high-performance computing, artificial intelligence, large-scale emulation, and DoD-specific capabilities such as advanced radars.”

Intel Scales Neuromorphic System to 100 Million Neurons

Today Intel unveiled Pohoiki Springs, its latest and most powerful neuromorphic research system providing the computational capacity of 100 million neurons. “Pohoiki Springs scales up our Loihi neuromorphic research chip by more than 750 times, while operating at a power level of under 500 watts,” said Mike Davies, director of Intel’s Neuromorphic Computing Lab. “The system enables our research partners to explore ways to accelerate workloads that run slowly today on conventional architectures, including high-performance computing (HPC) systems.”

ICHEC to Bring European Quantum Technologies Conference to Dublin

Over 500 global experts in quantum technologies will descend on Dublin in November this year for the European Quantum Technologies Conference (EQTC). Taking place Nov. 23-27 in Dublin, the event is the flagship event of the European Quantum Initiative a €1 billion initiative launched by the EU in 2018 to bring together research institutions, industry and public funders, to expand European scientific leadership and excellence in Quantum. “EQTC is an important stepping stone in positioning Ireland as an international global hub for quantum technologies and applications,” said Prof. Jean-Christophe (JC) Desplat, Director of ICHEC and Chair of the EQTC 2020 organizing committee.

New Paper: A novel error-correction scheme for quantum computers

By taking advantage of the infinite geometric space of a particular quantum system made up of bosons, the researchers, led by Dr Arne Grimsmo from the University of Sydney, have developed quantum error correction codes that should reduce the number of physical quantum switches, or qubits, required to scale up these machines to a useful size. “The beauty of these codes is they are ‘platform agnostic’ and can be developed to work with a wide range of quantum hardware systems,” Dr Grimsmo said.

UC Riverside to help develop scalable quantum computers

The University of California, Riverside, has won a University of California Multicampus-National Lab Collaborative Research and Training Award of $3.75 million that will allow the campus to focus on enabling scalable quantum computing. “The goal of this collaborative project is to establish a novel platform for quantum computing that is truly scalable up to many qubits,” said Boerge Hemmerling, an assistant professor of physics and astronomy at UC Riverside and the lead principal investigator of the three-year project. “Current quantum computing technology is far away from experimentally controlling the large number of qubits required for fault-tolerant computing. This stands in large contrast to what has been achieved in conventional computer chips in classical computing.”

TensorFlow Quantum software combines quantum and classical machine learning

University of Waterloo students have teamed up with Google to develop software to accelerate machine learning using quantum science. The collaborative effort resulted in the creation of an open-source hybrid quantum-classical machine learning software platform, called TensorFlow Quantum. TensorFlow Quantum integrates Google’s Cirq and TensorFlow and will allow for the rapid prototyping, training, inference, and […]

Finnish researchers demonstrate how noise impacts quantum computing

A team of researchers from three Finnish institutions (CSC, Aalto University, and Abo Akademi University) and their collaborators from Boston University in the USA have for the first time demonstrated how the noise impacts a calculation in a systematic way. By varying the time over which the quantum property of the qubits is changed (from microseconds to milliseconds) and studying different numbers of coupled qubits in a D-Wave device, they were able to confirm a general principle of defect creation (meaning errors in the calculation). “According to this principle, a longer computing time should give a better result, but the researchers found that the noise negatively affects the results more if the time is longer. They explained this behavior by a mathematical model, which will be a useful tool for diagnosing future quantum annealing devices and to find the best ways to operate them.”

ISC 2020 Keynotes Focus on Shaping Tomorrow

Today ISC 2020 announced that Mattias Troyer and Thomas Sterling will be keynote speakers at the event. During his keynote, Troyer will describe the hardware and software architectures of quantum computers systems and discuss how they differ from classical HPC systems. Sterling’s closing address this year promises to be more wide-ranging than his usual retrospective, as he traces the intersection of long-term trends involving the diminishing prospects of Moore’s Law, the lengthening lifetimes systems, the consolidation of the HPC market, and the ascent of machine learning.”