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D-Wave Collaborates with Virginia Tech on Quantum Computing

Today D-Wave Systems and Virginia Tech announced a joint effort to provide greater access to quantum computers for researchers from the Intelligence Community and Department of Defense. D-Wave and Virginia Tech will work towards the creation of a permanent quantum computing center to house a D-Wave system at the Hume Center for National Security and Technology. “Both D-Wave and Virginia Tech recognize how vital it is that quantum computing be accessible to a broad community of experts focused on solving real-world problems,” said Bo Ewald, president of D-Wave International. “One of the many reasons we chose to work with Virginia Tech is their strong relationships with the intelligence and defense communities. A key area of focus will be to work with federal agencies towards the creation of a quantum computing center at the Hume Center.”

Future Technologies on the Rise for HPC

“2017 will see the introduction of many technologies that will help shape the future of HPC systems. Production-scale ARM supercomputers, advancements in memory and storage technology such as DDN’s Infinite Memory Engine (IME), and much wider adoption of accelerator technologies and from Nvidia, Intel and FPGA manufacturers such as Xilinx and Altera, are all helping to define the supercomputers of tomorrow.”

Podcast: IBM Researchers Store Data on a Single Atom

Today IBM announced it has created the world’s smallest magnet using a single atom – and stored one bit of data on it. Currently, hard disk drives use about 100,000 atoms to store a single bit. The ability to read and write one bit on one atom creates new possibilities for developing significantly smaller and denser storage devices, that could someday, for example, enable storing the entire iTunes library of 35 million songs on a device the size of a credit card.

IBM to Build Commercially Available Quantum Computing Systems

“IBM has invested over decades to growing the field of quantum computing and we are committed to expanding access to quantum systems and their powerful capabilities for the science and business communities,” said Arvind Krishna, senior vice president of Hybrid Cloud and director for IBM Research. “Following Watson and blockchain, we believe that quantum computing will provide the next powerful set of services delivered via the IBM Cloud platform, and promises to be the next major technology that has the potential to drive a new era of innovation across industries.”

Interview: Dr. Thomas Sterling on New Approaches to Efficient Supercomputing

In this video from KAUST, Professor Thomas Sterling, Professor of Intelligent Systems Engineering at Indiana University, shares his thoughts on new approaches to energy efficient supercomputing. “Our technical strategy focuses on the research and development of advanced technologies for extreme-scale computing and future exascale systems, including the following key elements: Execution Models; Runtime Systems; Graph Processing; Programming Interfaces; Compilers, Libraries, and Languages; Systems Architecture (Architecture, Power/Energy, Fault Tolerance, Networking), and Extreme Scale Applications and Visualization.”

Katrin Amunts to Present on Decoding the Human Brain at PASC17

Today the PASC17 Conference announced Professor Katrin Amunts plenary presentation will be entitled, “Towards the Decoding of the Human Brain.” Regarded as one of the world’s foremost neuroscientists in the field of brain mapping, Dr. Amunts is director of the Cécile and Oskar Vogt Institute of Brain Research at the University of Düsseldorf, and director of the Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine at Forschungszentrum Jülich.

Beyond the Moore’s Law Cliff: The Next 1000X

In this video from the 2017 HPC Advisory Council Stanford Conference, Subhasish Mitra from Stanford presents: Beyond the Moore’s Law Cliff: The Next 1000X. Professor Subhasish Mitra directs the Robust Systems Group in the Department of Electrical Engineering and the Department of Computer Science of Stanford University, where he is the Chambers Faculty Scholar of Engineering. Prior to joining Stanford, he was a Principal Engineer at Intel Corporation. He received Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University.

Interview: Cray’s Steve Scott on What’s Next for Supercomputing

In this video from KAUST, Steve Scott from at Cray explains where supercomputing is going and why there is a never-ending demand for faster and faster computers. Responsible for guiding Cray’s long term product roadmap in high-performance computing, storage and data analytics, Mr. Scott is chief architect of several generations of systems and interconnects at Cray.

Video: Computing of the Future

Jeffrey Welser from IBM Research Almaden presented this talk at the Stanford HPC Conference. “Whether exploring new technical capabilities, collaborating on ethical practices or applying Watson technology to cancer research, financial decision-making, oil exploration or educational toys, IBM Research is shaping the future of AI.”

Tachyum Startup Looks to Break Performance and Cost Barriers to Intelligent Information Processing

Today Silicon Valley startup Tachyum Inc. launched, announcing its mission to conquer the performance plateau in nanometer-class chips and the systems they power. “We have entered a post-Moore’s Law era where performance hit a plateau, cost reduction slowed dramatically, and process node shrinks and CPU release cycles are getting longer,” said Danilak, Tachyum CEO. “An innovative new approach, from first principles is the only realistic chance we have of achieving performance improvements to rival those that powered the tech industry of past decades, and the opportunity is a hundred times greater than any venture I’ve been involved in.”