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Verne Global Offers Sustainable HPC in the Cloud

In this video from SC19, Tate Cantrell from Verne Global describes how the company delivers sustainable HPC in the Cloud. “Verne Global delivers true high performance computing solutions in an optimized environment, built upon renewable resources. Our expert team provides full life-cycle support to enable maximum performance and flexibility for customer workloads, whilst offering significant cost savings.”

Moving HPC to the Cloud with Easy8 and Bright Cluster Manager

In this video from SC19, Bill Wagner from Bright Computing announces the latest release of Bright Cluster Manager software for HPC, OpenStack, and Data Science. Now available for free for clusters up to eight nodes with the Easy8 program, Bright Cluster Manager simplifies building and managing Linux clusters from the core to the cloud and to the edge. “We are excited about the new features in 9.0,” said Bill Wagner, CEO of Bright Computing. “Our development team has been hard at work implementing a host of features designed to better extend on-premise clusters to the public cloud and edge, improve ease of use, lower administrative costs, and increase standardization across the enterprise.”

D-Wave Expands Leap API into Amazon Braket

Today D-Wave Systems announced the expansion of the Leap API into Amazon Braket, a new, fully managed Amazon Web Services (AWS) solution that allows scientists, researchers, and developers to begin experimenting with computers from quantum hardware providers in a single place. The service, announced today at AWS re:Invent 2019, gives AWS users live cloud access to D-Wave’s 2000Q quantum processor via the Leap quantum cloud service API. Customers and developers will be able to leverage D-Wave’s processing power in real time to run quantum applications directly from Amazon Braket. This access will extend to forthcoming D-Wave systems, such as the next-generation Advantage, coming in mid-2020.

Amazon Braket to offer Multivendor Quantum Computing Service

Today AWS announced Amazon Braket, a fully managed service that enables scientists, researchers, and developers to begin experimenting with computers from quantum hardware providers (including D-Wave Systems, IonQ, and Rigetti) in a single place. The quantum service is one of three key initiatives as a part of the company’s plans to help advance quantum computing technologies. “As a fully managed service, Braket makes it possible for customers to get started on quantum computing by providing a single development environment to build quantum algorithms, test them on simulated quantum computers, and try them on a range of different quantum hardware architectures.”

Qumulo Unified File Storage Reduces Administrative Burden While Consolidating HPC Workloads

Qumulo showcased its scalable file storage for high-performance computing workloads at SC19. The company helps innovative organizations gain real-time visibility, scale and control of their data across on-prem and the public cloud. More and more HPC institutes are looking to modern solutions that help them gain insights from their data, faster,” said Molly Presley, global product marketing director for Qumulo. “Qumulo helps the research community consolidate diverse workloads into a unified, simple-to-manage file storage solution. Workgroups focused on image data, analytics, and user home directories can share a single solution that delivers real-time visibility into billions of files while scaling performance on-prem or in the cloud to meet the demands of the most intensive research environments.”

Video: Characterizing Network Paths in and out of the Clouds

Igor Sfiligoi from SDSC gave this talk at CHEP 2019. “Cloud computing is becoming mainstream, with funding agencies moving beyond prototyping and starting to fund production campaigns, too. An important aspect of any production computing campaign is data movement, both incoming and outgoing. And while the performance and cost of VMs is relatively well understood, the network performance and cost is not.”

KISTI adds Rescale HPC Cloud Platform to Nurion Supercomputer

Today Rescale announced a strategic business agreement with the Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information to provide cloud services for KISTI’s Nurion supercomputer. “The existing HPC cluster required users to generate command lines in the terminal when performing computer-aided engineering (CAE). In contrast, the Rescale platform allows users to focus on research and development efforts more easily and quickly by building an optimal framework based on application characterizes such as Abaqus, ANSYS CFX, ANSYS Fluent, Gromacs and Quantum Espresso.”

VMware to add BitFusion GPU Virtualization to HPC Capabilities

In this video from SC19, Mohan Potheri from VMware describes how virtualization makes HPC users more productive. “High Performance Computing workloads are forecasted to be one of the fastest-growing workload types through 2020. With VMware, you can capture the benefits of virtualization for HPC workloads while delivering performance that is comparable to bare-metal. Our approach to virtualizing HPC adds a level of flexibility, operational efficiency, agility and security that cannot be achieved in bare-metal environments—enabling faster time to insights and discovery.”

DDN Steps up with High Performance Storage at SC19

In this video from SC19, James Coomer from DDN describes the company’s latest storage solutions for high performance computing. “At the conference, DDN announced new infrastructure and multicloud solutions as well as new data management features in its EXAScaler “EXA5” file solution, which will be generally available over the next two calendar quarters. These solutions and features reinforce DDN’s position as the data platform of choice for performance at scale by further helping customers effectively deploy, manage and accelerate next generation AI and analytics workloads.”

SDSC Conducts 50,000+ GPU Cloudburst Experiment with Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center

In all, some 51,500 GPU processors were used during the approximately two-hour experiment conducted on November 16 and funded under a National Science Foundation EAGER grant. The experiment used simulations from the IceCube Neutrino Observatory, an array of some 5,160 optical sensors deep within a cubic kilometer of ice at the South Pole. In 2017, researchers at the NSF-funded observatory found the first evidence of a source of high-energy cosmic neutrinos – subatomic particles that can emerge from their sources and pass through the universe unscathed, traveling for billions of light years to Earth from some of the most extreme environments in the universe.