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Video: Lustre Features and Future

Andreas Dilger from Whamcloud gave this talk at LAD’19 in Paris. “For a number of years, a majority of the world’s 100 fastest supercomputers have relied on Lustre for their storage needs. If you need lots of data fast and reliably, and value the flexibility of using a wide choice of block storage and want to become part of a world-wide open community, then Lustre is a good choice.”

Video: Lustre Community Release Update

In this video from LAD’19 in Paris, Peter Jones from Whamcloud presents: Lustre Community Release Update. “Lustre is a vibrant Open Source project with many organizations working on new features and improvements in parallel. We coordinate those efforts primarily through OpenSFS and EOFS. Meeting development target dates is a difficult task for any software project, but doubly so in a globally distributed Open Source project.”

OpenSFS Announces Lustre 2.13.0 Release

On December 5, OpenSFS announced Lustre 2.13.0 Release has been declared GA and is available for download. The Lustre file system is a open source, parallel file system that supports the requirements of leadership class HPC and Enterprise environments worldwide. Lustre provides a POSIX compliant interface and scales to thousands of clients, petabytes of storage, and has demonstrated over a terabyte per second of sustained I/O bandwidth. “New features include: Persistent Client Cache, Multi-Rail Routing, Overstriping, and self-extending layouts.”

Lustre Trademark Released to User Community

In this video from SC19, Stephen Simms from OpenSFS and Frank Baetke from EOFS announce the release of the Lustre trademark back to the Lustre community. “We are very pleased to have reached such an agreement with Seagate and are exited that from now on the Lustre community represented by EOFS and OpenSFS equally owns all the assets related to the URL lustre.org as well as the word LUSTRE and its design marks.”

What to expect at SC19

In this special guest feature, Dr. Rosemary Francis gives her perspective on what to look for at SC19 conference next week in Denver. “There are always many questions circling the HPC market in the run up to Supercomputing. In 2019, the focus is even more focused on the cloud in previous years. Here are a few of the topics that could occupy your coffee queue conversations in Denver this year.”

Production Trial Shows Global Science Possible with CAE-1 100Gbps link

In early November, A*CRC, ICM, and Zettar conducted a production trial over the newly built Collaboration Asia Europe-1 (CAE-1) 100Gbps link connecting Europe and Singapore. “The project has established a historical first,” said Zettar CEO Chin Fang. “For the first time over the newly built CAE-1 link, with a production setup at ICM end, it has shown that moving data at great speed and scale between Poland (and thus Eastern Europe) and Singapore is a reality. Furthermore, although the project was initiated only in mid-October, all goals have been reached and a few new grounds have also been broken as well. It is also a true international collaboration.”

AMD to Power Cray Shasta Supercomputer coming to AWE in the UK

Today Cray announced that the United Kingdom’s Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) has selected the Cray Shasta supercomputer to support security and defence of the U.K. Called Vulcan, AWE’s new machine powered by AMD EPYC processors will deliver approximately 7 petaflops of performance and play an integral role in maintaining the U.K.’s nuclear deterrent. “Shasta will bring Exascale Era technologies to bear on AWE’s challenging modeling and simulation data-intensive workload and enable the convergence of AI and analytics into this same workload, on a single system.”

AMD to Power Cray’s ARCHER2 Supercomputer in the UK

Following a procurement exercise, UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) are pleased to announce that Cray, an HPE company, has been awarded the contract to supply the hardware for the next national supercomputer, ARCHER2. Powered by AMD EPYC processors, ARCHER2 will be deployed at the University of Edinburgh. “Needless to say, ARCHER2 represents a significant step forwards in capability for the UK science community, with the system expected to sit among the fastest fully general purpose (CPU only) systems when it comes into service in May 2020.”

Harvard Names New Lenovo HPC Cluster after Astronomer Annie Jump Cannon

Harvard has deployed a liquid-cooled supercomputer from Lenovo at it’s FASRC computing center. The system, named “Cannon” in honor of astronomer Annie Jump Cannon, is a large-scale HPC cluster supporting scientific modeling and simulation for thousands of Harvard researchers. “This new cluster will have 30,000 cores of Intel 8268 “Cascade Lake” processors. Each node will have 48 cores and 192 GB of RAM.”

Video: What Can HPC on AWS Do?

Ian Colle from Amazon gave this talk at the HPC User Forum. “AWS provides the most elastic and scalable cloud infrastructure to run your HPC applications. With virtually unlimited capacity, engineers, researchers, and HPC system owners can innovate beyond the limitations of on-premises HPC infrastructure. AWS delivers an integrated suite of services that provides everything needed to quickly and easily build and manage HPC clusters in the cloud to run the most compute intensive workloads across various industry verticals.”