Sign up for our newsletter and get the latest HPC news and analysis.
Send me information from insideHPC:


Panel Discussion: Delivering Exascale Computing for the Oil and Gas Industry

In this video from the 2018 Rice Oil & Gas Conference, Addison Snell from Intersect360 Research leads a panel discussion on Exascale computing. “High-end computing and information technology continues to stand out across the industry as a critical business enabler and differentiator with a relatively well understood return on investment. However, challenges such as constantly changing technology landscape, increasing focus on software and software innovation, and escalating concerns around workforce development still remain.”

Call for Abstracts: FLOW-3D Users Conference in Denver

The 2018 FLOW-3D Americas Users Conference has announced their Call for Abstracts. Featuring customer presentations on validations, benchmarks, and case studies, the event takes place August 7-8 at the Warwick Hotel in Denver, CO. “The call for abstracts  is now open. Share your experiences, present your success stories and obtain valuable feedback from your fellow FLOW-3D users and our technical staff. Abstracts should include a title, author and a 200 word description.”

Transforming Scientific Data into Immersive Visualizations

In this video, Colleen Heinemann, a Ph.D. student with the University of Illinois, describes how visualization makes scientific data more accessible and useful by transforming it into virtual objects you can see, touch and manipulate in 3-D space. “My research interest is in the cross section between High Performance Computing and scientific visualization. I am interested in not only presenting scientific data in an interesting way, but also in how High Performance Computing can be used to optimize the visualization process.”

XSEDE offers free HPC Training from Cornell Virtual Workshop

Today Cornell University announced that four new Cornell Virtual Workshop training topics are available at the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) user portal. “The Cornell University Center for Advanced Computing (CAC) is a leader in the development and deployment of Web-based training programs designed to enhance the computational skills of researchers, broaden the participation of underrepresented groups in the sciences and engineering, and accelerate the adoption of new and emerging technologies.”

RCR uses Simulation to Accelerate Racecar Development

Richard Childress Racing (RCR) is hoping to improve racing times through a multi-year partnership with ANSYS. RCR will use ANSYS Pervasive Engineering Simulation software to more accurately predict machine performance and enhance vehicle speed on the race track. “Using ANSYS Pervasive Engineering Simulation throughout the entire racecar lifecycle, RCR will race faster, safer and more aerodynamic vehicles.”

GPU Technology Conference Returns to San Jose March 26-29

NVIDIA will host thousands of the world’s leading AI experts at its ninth annual GPU Technology Conference (GTC) on March 26-29 in San Jose, California. “GTC is where the world’s leading researchers and business leaders learn how to harness the power of AI,” said Greg Estes, vice president of Developer Programs at NVIDIA. “As GPU computing continues to drive the AI revolution, GTC is where you’ll see the future take shape.”

Living Heart Project: Using HPC in the Cloud to Save Lives

Burak Yenier and Francisco Sahli gave this talk at the Stanford HPC Conference. “Cardiac arrhythmia can be a potentially lethal side effect of medications. Before a new drug reaches the market, pharmaceutical companies need to check for the risk of inducing arrhythmias. Currently, this process takes years and involves costly animal and human studies. In this project, the Living Matter Laboratory of Stanford University developed a new software tool enabling drug developers to quickly assess the viability of a new compound. During this session we will look at how High Performance Computing in the Cloud is being used to prevent severe side effects and save lives.”

Supercomputing Graphene Applications in Nanoscale Electronics

Researchers at North Carolina State University are using the Blue Waters Supercomputer to explore graphene’s applications, including its use in nanoscale electronics and electrical DNA sequencing. “We’re looking at what’s beyond Moore’s law, whether one can devise very small transistors based on only one atomic layer, using new methods of making materials,” said Professor Jerry Bernholc, from North Carolina University. “We are looking at potential transistor structures consisting of a single layer of graphene, etched into lines of nanoribbons, where the carbon atoms are arranged like a chicken wire pattern. We are looking at which structures will function well, at a few atoms of width.”

HACC: Fitting the Universe inside a Supercomputer

Nicholas Frontiere from the University of Chicago gave this talk at the DOE CSGF Program Review meeting. “In response to the plethora of data from current and future large-scale structure surveys of the universe, sophisticated simulations are required to obtain commensurate theoretical predictions. We have developed the Hardware/Hybrid Accelerated Cosmology Code (HACC), capable of sustained performance on powerful and architecturally diverse supercomputers to address this numerical challenge. We will investigate the numerical methods utilized to solve a problem that evolves trillions of particles, with a dynamic range of a million to one.”

TACC Podcast Looks at AI and Water Management

In this TACC podcast, Suzanne Pierce from the Texas Advanced Computing Center describes her upcoming panel discussion on AI and water management and the work TACC is doing to support efforts to bridge advanced computing with Earth science. “It’s about letting the AI help us be better decision makers. And it helps us move towards answering, discussing, and exploring the questions that are most important and most critical for our quality of life and our communities so that we can develop a future together that’s brighter.”