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GPUs Power Near-global Climate Simulation at 1 km Resolution

A new peer-reviewed paper is reportedly causing a stir in the climatology community. “The best hope for reducing long-standing global climate model biases, is through increasing the resolution to the kilometer scale. Here we present results from an ultra-high resolution non-hydrostatic climate model for a near-global setup running on the full Piz Daint supercomputer on 4888 GPUs.”

COMSOL Conference Showcases Next-Gen Multiphysics

Attendees of the COMSOL Conference in Boston this week were treated to a sneak preview future developments of the popular multiphysics software from Svante Littmarck, President and CEO of COMSOL. The conference featured a robust technical program with approximately 300 attendees. “Our customers are at the forefront of innovation behind the products that will shape our future,” says Littmarck. “We work tirelessly to support their efforts by increasing the modeling power of the COMSOL software and by making collaboration among simulation experts and their colleagues the core of everything we do. This annual event is our opportunity to connect and exchange knowledge within the COMSOL community on multiphysics modeling.”

SC17 Highlights Nobel Prize Winning LIGO Collaboration

In this video from SC17, researchers discuss the role of HPC in the Nobel Prize-winning discovery of gravitational waves, originally theorized 100 years ago by Albert Einstein in his general theory of relativity. “We are only now beginning to hear the vibrations of space-time that are all around us—we just needed a better ear. And when we detect that, we’re detecting the vibrations of everything that has ever moved in the universe. This is real. This is really there, and we’ve never noticed it until now.”

HPC Powers High Pressure Casting Simulation at Shiloh Industries

Hal Gerber from Shiloh Industries gave this talk at the HPC User Forum in Milwaukee. “Shiloh is the global leader in high-integrity, high-vacuum, high-pressure die castings, providing high ductility in aluminum and magnesium. Shiloh Industries is a global innovative solutions provider focusing on “lightweighting” technologies that provide environmental and safety benefits to the mobility market.”

Fighting the West Nile Virus with HPC & Analytical Ultracentrifugation

Researchers are using new techniques with HPC to learn more about how the West Nile virus replicates inside the brain. “Over several years, Demeler has developed analysis software for experiments performed with analytical ultracentrifuges. The goal is to facilitate the extraction of all of the information possible from the available data. To do this, we developed very high-resolution analysis methods that require high performance computing to access this information,” he said. “We rely on HPC. It’s absolutely critical.”

Jonathan Poggie from Purdue Wins DoD Computing Award

Associate Professor Jonathan Poggie and his team from Purdue have received a large research grant from the U.S. Department of Defense for supercomputing resources. The award enables science and technology research that would not be possible without extraordinary computer resources. “Poggie is the principal investigator for a new U.S. Department of Defense high-performance computing modernization program beginning in October, entitled “Prediction of Hypersonic Laminar-Turbulent Transition through Direct Numerical Simulation.” The project is focused on making conventional hypersonic wind tunnels more useful for vehicle design by helping designers work through the noise and turbulence present in the tunnels and allowing them to more accurately interpret the results of the wind tunnel tests.”

Engility To Provide NOAA With HPC Expertise

Today Engility announced $14 million in task order awards from NOAA’s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory. Engility scientists will conduct HPC software development and optimization, help users gain scientific insights, and maintain cyber security controls on NOAA’s R&D High Performance Computing System. These services assist NOAA GFDL in enhancing and advancing their HPC capability to explore and understand climate and weather. “As we saw with Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, a deeper understanding of climate and weather are critical to America’s preparedness, infrastructure and security stance,” said Lynn Dugle, CEO of Engility. “Engility has been at the forefront of leveraging HPC to advance scientific discovery and solve the toughest engineering problems. HPC is, and will continue to be, an area of high interest and value among our customers as they seek to analyze huge and ever-expanding data sets.”

Exascale Computing to Accelerate Clean Fusion Energy

In this special guest feature, Jon Bashor from LBNL writes that Exascale computing will accelerate the push toward clean fusion energy. “Turning this from a promising technology into a mainstream scientific tool depends critically on high-performance, high-fidelity modeling of complex processes that develop over a wide range of space and time scales.”

Supercomputing Jet Noise for a Quieter World

Researchers at the University of Minnesota are using Argonne supercomputers to to look for new ways to reduce the noise produced by jet engines. Among the loudest sources of human-made noise that exist, jet engines can produce sound in excess of 130 decibels. “The University of Minnesota team developed a new method based on input-output analysis that can predict both the downstream noise and the sideline noise. While it was thought that the sideline noise was random, the input-output modes show coherent structure in the jet that is connected to the sideline noise, such that it can be predicted and controlled.”

HPC Reveals Glacial Flow

In this special guest feature from Scientific Computing World, Robert Roe looks at research from the University of Alaska that is using HPC to change the way we look at the movement of ice sheets. “The computational muscle behind this research project comes from the UAF’s Geophysical Institute which houses two HPC systems ‘Chinook’, an Intel based cluster from Penguin Computing and ‘Fish’ a Cray system installed in 2012 based on the Cray XK6m-200 that uses AMD processors.”