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Supercomputing Ocean Wave Energy

Researchers are using XSEDE supercomputers to help develop ocean waves into a sustainable energy source. “We primarily used our simulation techniques to investigate inertial sea wave energy converters, which are renewable energy devices developed by our collaborators at the Polytechnic University of Turin that convert wave energy from large bodies of water into electrical energy,” explained study co-author Amneet Pal Bhalla from SDSU.

Supercomputing the spread of the coronavirus in busy indoor spaces

A joint project carried out by four Finnish research organisations has studied the transport and spread of coronavirus through the air. Preliminary results indicate that aerosol particles carrying the virus can remain in the air longer than was originally thought, so it is important to avoid busy public indoor spaces. This also reduces the risk of droplet infection, which remains the main path of transmission for coronavirus.

Intel Commits $50 Million to Pandemic Response Technology Initiative

Today, Intel pledged an additional $50 million in a pandemic response technology initiative to combat the coronavirus through accelerating access to technology at the point of patient care, speeding scientific research and ensuring access to online learning for students. Included in Intel’s effort is an additional innovation fund for requests where access to Intel expertise and resources can have immediate impact. “We hope that by sharing our expertise, resources and technology, we can help to accelerate work that saves lives and expands access to critical services around the world during this challenging time.”

Jülich Supercomputers Power New Insights into Brain Imaging

Researchers are using biophysical modeling and simulations on Jülich supercomputers to develop new brain tissue imaging methods. “When generating a detailed network model of the brain, nerve fiber crossings pose a major challenge for current neuroimaging techniques. Scientists at Forschungszentrum Jülich have now found that scattered light can be used to resolve the brain’s substructure like the crossing angles of the nerve fibers with micrometer resolution. For their studies, the researchers combined microscopy measurements and simulations on supercomputers.”

NERSC Supercomputer to Help Fight Coronavirus

“NERSC is a member of the COVID-19 High Performance Computing Consortium. In support of the Consortium, NERSC has reserved a portion of its Director’s Discretionary Reserve time on Cori, a Cray XC40 supercomputer, to support COVID-19 research efforts. The GPU partition on Cori was installed to help prepare applications for the arrival of Perlmutter, NERSC’s next-generation system that is scheduled to begin arriving later this year and will rely on GPUs for much of its computational power.”

ICHEC: Satellite Data Indicates Illegal Burning in Rural Areas of Ireland During COVID-19 Shutdown

Satellite Data analyzed by scientists from ICHEC (Irish Centre for High-End Computing) using European Space Agency Sentinel 5-P satellite data shows evidence of Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2) emissions in a number of rural areas during February and March 2020. “ICHEC released imagery today, April 3 in which the scientists observed general reductions in emissions (blue areas of the maps) from the lower levels of activity in the economy due to COVID-19 but also observed a few spikes (red areas) on some dates, most likely associated with fires in rural areas.”

NPR Podcast: Scientists Use Supercomputers To Search For Drugs To Combat COVID-19

In this segment from the NPR Here and Now program, Joe Palca talks to researchers using ORNL supercomputers to fight COVID-19. “Supercomputers have joined the race to find a drug that might help with COVID-19. Scientists are using computational techniques to see if any drugs already on the shelf might be effective against the disease. The two researchers performed simulations on Summit of more than 8,000 compounds to screen for those that are most likely to bind to the main “spike” protein of the coronavirus, rendering it unable to infect host cells.”

Job of the Week: Research Scientist at the University of Wyoming

The Center of Innovation for Flow through Porous media (COIFPM) at the University of Wyoming has multiple openings for highly motivated research scientists to join its computational research branch. The focus of the modeling team is to develop advanced computational tools to simulate multiphase flow and transport in porous materials. To this end, we utilize high-performance computing techniques to build innovative and highly parallelized computer platforms that are tested on powerful supercomputers and validated against experimental data.

LLNL Researchers aid COVID-19 response in anti-viral research

Backed by five high performance computing (HPC) clusters and years of expertise in vaccine and countermeasure development, a COVID-19 response team of LLNL researchers from various disciplines has used modeling & simulation, along with machine learning, to identify about 20 initial, yet promising, antibody designs from a nearly infinite set of potentials and to examine millions of small molecules that could have anti-viral properties. The candidates will need to be synthesized and experimentally tested — which Lab researchers cautioned could take time — but progress is being made.

Podcast: Supercomputing the Coronavirus on Frontera

Scientists are preparing a massive computer model of the coronavirus that they expect will give insight into how it infects in the body. They’ve taken the first steps, testing the first parts of the model and optimizing code on the Frontera supercomputer at the Texas Advanced Computing Center of UT Austin. The knowledge gained from the full model can help researchers design new drugs and vaccines to combat the coronavirus.