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Video: Evolution of MATLAB

Cleve Moler from MathWorks gave this talk at the 2017 Argonne Training Program on Extreme-Scale Computing. “MATLAB is a high-performance language for technical computing. It integrates computation, visualization, and programming in an easy-to-use environment where problems and solutions are expressed in familiar mathematical notation. Typical uses include: Data analysis, exploration, and visualization.”

Searching for Human Brain Memory Molecules with the Piz Daint Supercomputer

Scientists at the University of Basel are using the Piz Daint supercomputer at CSCS to discover interrelationships in the human genome that might simplify the search for “memory molecules” and eventually lead to more effective medical treatment for people with diseases that are accompanied by memory disturbance. “Until now, searching for genes related to memory capacity has been comparable to seeking out the proverbial needle in a haystack.”

HPC Connects: Mapping Global Ocean Currents

In this video from the SC17 HPC Connects series, Dimitris Menemenlis from NASA JPL/Caltech describes how supercomputing enables scientists to accurately map global ocean currents. The ocean is vast and there are still a lot of unknowns. We still can’t represent all the conditions and are pushing the boundaries of current supercomputer power,” said Menemenlis. “This is an exciting time to be an oceanographer who can use satellite observations and numerical simulations to push our understanding of ocean circulation forward.”

Visualization in Software using Intel Xeon Phi processors

“Intel has been at the forefront of working with software partners to develop solutions for visualization of data that will scale in the future as many core systems such as the Intel Xeon Phi processor scale. The Intel Xeon Phi processor is extremely capable of producing visualizations that allow scientists and engineers to interactively view massive amounts of data.”

How Manufacturing will Leap Forward with Exascale Computing

In this special guest feature, Jeremy Thomas from Lawrence Livermore National Lab writes that exascale computing will be a vital boost to the U.S. manufacturing industry. “This is much bigger than any one company or any one industry. If you consider any industry, exascale is truly going to have a sizeable impact, and if a country like ours is going to be a leader in industrial design, engineering and manufacturing, we need exascale to keep the innovation edge.”

Video: Supercomputing Models Enable Detection of a Cosmic Cataclysm

In this podcast, Peter Nugent from Berkeley Lab explains how scientists confirmed the first-ever measurement of the merger of two neutron stars and its explosive aftermath. “Simulations succeeded in modeling what would happen in an incredibly complex phenomenon like a neutron star merger. Without the models, we all probably all would have been mystified by exactly what we were seeing in the sky.”

Supercomputing Earthquakes in the Age of Exascale

Tomorrow’s exascale supercomputers will enable researchers to accurately simulate the ground motions of regional earthquakes quickly and in unprecedented detail. “Simulations of high frequency earthquakes are more computationally demanding and will require exascale computers,” said David McCallen, who leads the ECP-supported effort. “Ultimately, we’d like to get to a much larger domain, higher frequency resolution and speed up our simulation time.”

Video: NASA Advanced Computing Environment for Science & Engineering

Rupak Biswas from NASA gave this talk at the Argonne Training Program on Extreme-Scale Computing. “High performance computing is now integral to NASA’s portfolio of missions to pioneer the future of space exploration, accelerate scientific discovery, and enable aeronautics research. Anchored by the Pleiades supercomputer at NASA Ames Research Center, the High End Computing Capability (HECC) Project provides a fully integrated environment to satisfy NASA’s diverse modeling, simulation, and analysis needs.”

Supercomputing Virus Structures at Nanoscale with XFEL

A team at Berkeley Lab are using innovative computational methods to enable new X-ray science. “The creation of XFEL facilities, including the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and the European X-FEL, have created opportunities for conducting new experiments which can overcome the limitations of traditional crystallography.”

HPC Connects: How Supercomputers Are Unraveling the Mystery of the Human Brain

In this video from SC17, Katrin Amunts from Jülich highlights how the massive European-based Human Brain Project (HBP), comprising a veritable orchestra of scientists, collaborates to deliver the most exquisitely detailed human brain models ever created. “We have to create an ‘atlas’ (of the brain) that has a very large size in terms and bits and bytes,” Amunts said.