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Video: Toward a General AI-Agent Architecture

Richard S. Sutton from DeepMind Alberta gave this talk NeurIPS 2019. “In practice, I work primarily in reinforcement learning as an approach to artificial intelligence. I am exploring ways to represent a broad range of human knowledge in an empirical form–that is, in a form directly in terms of experience–and in ways of reducing the dependence on manual encoding of world state and knowledge.”

Video: Overview of HPC Interconnects

Ken Raffenetti from Argonne gave this talk at ATPESC 2019. “The Argonne Training Program on Extreme-Scale Computing (ATPESC) provides intensive, two-week training on the key skills, approaches, and tools to design, implement, and execute computational science and engineering applications on current high-end computing systems and the leadership-class computing systems of the future.”

Job of the Week: HPC Systems Administrator at Washington State University

CIRC at Washington State University is seeking an HPC Systems Administrator in our Job of the Week. “Ideal candidates should have in-depth experience with the provisioning and administration of HPC clusters. Applicants who have experience with CentOS or RHEL, high speed networking using Mellanox Infiniband, resource schedulers such as Slurm, automation tools such as SaltStack, and parallel file systems including BeeGFS and Spectrum Scale, are highly encouraged to apply.”

ISC 2020 Launches HPC Career Day

Fostering STEM education is a key to the future of high performance computing. Along these lines, ISC 2020 HPC Career Day will give 200 job seekers interested in HPC the opportunity to participate in the ISC 2020 conference on Wednesday, June 24. “Organizations scouting for STEM talent are welcome to utilize this new program to make connections with students, early and mid-career professionals looking for exciting prospects within the areas of HPC, machine learning, and data analytics.”

Purdue University to open Scalable Open Laboratory for Cyber Experimentation

Purdue University’s CERIAS Center for Education and Research in Information Assurance and Security has announced the addition of a new laboratory facility that dramatically increases Purdue’s cyber-physical research, emulation, and analysis capabilities. “This new laboratory is a mirror of the facilities already within Sandia National Labs that have served as the platform for joint CERIAS and DOE research since 2017,” said Theresa Mayer, executive vice president for research and partnerships at Purdue University. “The opening of SOL4CE at Purdue allows us to increase both the speed and impact of our national security research collaboration with Sandia National Labs.”

IRIS and XSEDE to investigate the impact of research supercomputing

A partnership XSEDE and the Institute for Research on Innovation and Science (IRIS) will examine how access to advanced research computing resources and services available via XSEDE affect the collaboration networks and scientific productivity of participating researchers. “IRIS will link the IRIS UMETRICS dataset containing transaction-level administrative data on sponsored research projects from dozens of the nation’s leading higher educational institutions to data from XSEDE allocations. This will result in a new way to examine how access to supercomputers influences the way researchers collaborate with colleagues and the productivity of individuals and research teams.”

New Argonne etching technique could advance semiconductors

Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory have developed a new molecular layer etching technique that could potentially enable the manufacture of increasingly small microelectronics. “Our ability to control matter at the nanoscale is limited by the kinds of tools we have to add or remove thin layers of material. Molecular layer etching (MLE) is a tool to allow manufacturers and researchers to precisely control the way thin materials, at microscopic and nanoscales, are removed,” said lead author Matthias Young, an assistant professor at the University of Missouri and former postdoctoral researcher at Argonne.

Visualizing an Entire Brain at Nanoscale Resolution

In this video from SC19, Berkeley researchers visualizes an entire brain at nanoscale resolution. The work was published in the journal, Science. “At the core of the work is the combination of expansion microscopy and lattice light-sheet microscopy (ExLLSM) to capture large super-resolution image volumes of neural circuits using high-speed, nano-scale molecular microscopy.”

How HPC is Powering the Age of Genomic Big Data

In this special guest feature, Jeff Reser from SUSE describes how Linux and HPC are key enabling technologies behind the research and breakthroughs in Genomics. “The Human Genome Project is an excellent example of large-scale international cooperation. It took a closely-coordinated and collaborative team effort to complete. Once the human genome had been successfully sequenced and decoded, it was immediately made publicly available. Since then, new information has been regularly published and made freely available. Here at SUSE, we’re totally committed to this community-driven “open source” ideal. It permeates everything we do.”

Exascale Computing Project Announces Staff Changes Within Software Technology Group

The US Department of Energy’s Exascale Computing Project (ECP) has announced the following staff changes within the Software Technology group. Lois Curfman McInnes from Argonne will replace Jonathan Carter as Deputy Director for Software Technology. Meanwhile Sherry Li is now team lead for Math Libraries. “We are fortunate to have such an incredibly seasoned, knowledgeable, and respected staff to help us lead the ECP efforts in bringing the nation’s first exascale computing software environment to fruition,” said Mike Heroux from Sandia National Labs.