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Job of the Week: Software Engineer at NCAR

NCAR in Boulder is seeking a Software Engineer in our Job of the Week. “This position focuses primarily on the development of tools to meet the needs for the NCAR/IT community, and the design, writing, implementation, and support for systems monitoring tools necessary for the management of the computer infrastructure. Support will also be provided to the research community for the development of web-based analysis tools and general web programming.”

OpenACC Brings Directives to Accelerated Computing at ISC 2017

In this video from ISC 2017, Sunita Chandrasekaran and Michael Wolfe describe how OpenACC makes GPU-accelerated computing more accessible to scientists and engineers. “OpenACC is a user-driven directive-based performance-portable parallel programming model designed for scientists and engineers interested in porting their codes to a wide-variety of heterogeneous HPC hardware platforms and architectures with significantly less programming effort than required with a low-level model.”

Agenda Posted: August MVAPICH User Group Meeting in Ohio

The MVAPICH User Group Meeting (MUG) has posted its meeting agenda. The event takes place August 14-16, 2017 in Columbus, Ohio. “As the annual gathering of MVAPICH2 users, researchers, developers, and system administrators, the MUG event includes Keynote Talks, Invited Tutorials, Invited Talks, Contributed Presentations, Open MIC session, and hands-on sessions.”

Red Hat Ceph Storage Powers Research at the University of Alabama at Birmingham

On June 6, Red Hat announced that the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) is using Red Hat Ceph Storage to support the growing needs of its research community. UAB selected Red Hat Ceph Storage because it offers researchers a flexible platform that can accommodate the vast amounts of data necessary to support future innovation and discovery. “UAB is a leader in computational research, with more than $500 million in annual research expenditures in areas including engineering, statistical genetics, genomics and next-generation gene sequencing,” said Curtis A. Carver Jr., VP and CIO at UAB. “Researchers and students aggregate, analyze, and store massive amounts of data, which is used to support groundbreaking medical discoveries from new cancer biomarkers to state-of-the-art magnetic resonance imaging techniques.”

Video: Towards Quantum High Performance Computing

“Following an introduction to the exceptional computational power of quantum computers using analogies with classical high performance computing systems, I will discuss real-world application problems that can be tackled on medium scale quantum computers but not on post exa-scale classical computers. I will motivate hardware software co-design of quantum accelerators to classical supercomputers and the need for educating a new generation of quantum software engineers with knowledge both in quantum computing and in high performance computing.”

Intel Launches Movidius Neural Compute Stick

Today, Intel launched the Movidius Neural Compute Stick, the world’s first USB-based deep learning inference kit and self-contained artificial intelligence accelerator that delivers dedicated deep neural network processing capabilities to a wide range of host devices at the edge. Designed for product developers, researchers and makers, the Movidius Neural Compute Stick aims to reduce barriers to developing, tuning and deploying AI applications by delivering dedicated high-performance deep-neural network processing in a small form factor.

Fernanda Foertter Elected SIG HPC Education Vice Chair

Today the Association for Computing Machinery’s Special Interest Group on High Performance Computing (SIGHPC) announced that Fernanda Foertter from ORNL is the new Vice Chair of the organization’s Education Committee. In this position, Foertter will support the goals of SIGHPC Education to promote increased knowledge and greater interest in the educational and scientific aspects of HPC. “Organizations such as SIGHPC broadens our periphery of other individuals within the HPC field. By connecting with my peers, I can make better decisions about what kinds of HPC training are needed and desired both within and outside of our own lab,” Foertter said.

Interview: The Computational Challenges of Fusion Energy

In this video from PASC17, Yasuhiro Idomura from the Japan Atomic Energy Agency and Laurent Villard from EPFL discuss the computational challenges of developing Fusion reactors. “Numerical plasma physics models are used to improve our understanding of transport, instability growth and other poorly understood phenomena encountered in the experimental devices edging toward viable fusion energy. Since computational expense imposes a major limitation on accurate physical modeling, computational resources must be used as efficiently as possible.”

Agenda Posted: Hot Interconnects Conference in Santa Clara

The Hot Interconnects conference has posted their program Agenda. The event takes place Aug. 28-30 in Santa Clara, California. “Join us for our 25th year of an information-packed three-day Symposium about the latest in High Performance Interconnects. IEEE Hot Interconnects is the premier international forum for researchers and developers of state-of-the-art hardware and software architectures and implementations for interconnection networks of all scales, ranging from multi-core on-chip interconnects to those within systems, clusters, and data centers. Leaders in industry and academia attend the conference to interact with individuals at the forefront of this field.”

Supercomputing the Signature of Chaos in Ultracold Reactions

Researchers have performed the first ever quantum-mechanical simulation of the benchmark ultracold chemical reaction between potassium-rubidium (KRb) and a potassium atom, opening the door to new controlled chemistry experiments and quantum control of chemical reactions that could spark advances in quantum computing and sensing technologies. The research by a multi-institutional team simulated the ultracold chemical reaction, with results that had not been revealed in experiments. “We found that the overall reactivity is largely insensitive to the underlying chaotic dynamics of the system,” said Brian Kendrick of Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Theoretical Division, “This observation has important implications for the development of controlled chemistry and for the technological applications of ultracold molecules from precision measurement to quantum computing.”