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UK to invest £1.2 billion for Supercomputing Weather and Climate Science

Today the UK announced plans to invest £1.2 billion for the world’s most powerful weather and climate supercomputer. The government investment will replace Met Office supercomputing capabilities over a 10-year period from 2022 to 2032. The current Met Office Cray supercomputers reach their end of life in late 2022. The first phase of the new supercomputer will increase the Met Office computing capacity by 6-fold alone.”

The GigaIO FabreX Network – New Frontiers in Networking For Big Data

GigaIO has developed a new whitepaper to describe GigaIO FabreX, a fundamentally new network architecture that integrates computing, storage, and other communication I/O into a single-system cluster network, using industry standard PCIe (peripheral component interconnect express) technology.

Isambard 2 at UK Met Office to be largest Arm supercomputer in Europe

The  UK Met Office  been awarded £4.1m by EPSRC to create Isambard 2, the largest Arm-based supercomputer in Europe. The powerful new £6.5m facility, to be hosted by the Met Office in Exeter and utilized by the universities of Bath, Bristol, Cardiff and Exeter, will double the size of GW4 Isambard, to 21,504 high performance cores and 336 nodes. “Isambard 2 will incorporate the latest novel technologies from HPE and new partner Fujitsu, including next-generation Arm CPUs in one of the world’s first A64fx machines from Cray.”

Predictions for HPC in 2020

In this special guest feature from Scientific Computing World, Laurence Horrocks-Barlow from OCF predicts that containerization, cloud, and GPU-based workloads are all going to dominate the HPC environment in 2020. “Over the last year, we’ve seen a strong shift towards the use of cloud in HPC, particularly in the case of storage. Many research institutions are working towards a ‘cloud first’ policy, looking for cost savings in using the cloud rather than expanding their data centres with overheads, such as cooling, data and cluster management and certification requirements.”

Video: Toward a General AI-Agent Architecture

Richard S. Sutton from DeepMind Alberta gave this talk NeurIPS 2019. “In practice, I work primarily in reinforcement learning as an approach to artificial intelligence. I am exploring ways to represent a broad range of human knowledge in an empirical form–that is, in a form directly in terms of experience–and in ways of reducing the dependence on manual encoding of world state and knowledge.”

Video: Overview of HPC Interconnects

Ken Raffenetti from Argonne gave this talk at ATPESC 2019. “The Argonne Training Program on Extreme-Scale Computing (ATPESC) provides intensive, two-week training on the key skills, approaches, and tools to design, implement, and execute computational science and engineering applications on current high-end computing systems and the leadership-class computing systems of the future.”

Purdue University to open Scalable Open Laboratory for Cyber Experimentation

Purdue University’s CERIAS Center for Education and Research in Information Assurance and Security has announced the addition of a new laboratory facility that dramatically increases Purdue’s cyber-physical research, emulation, and analysis capabilities. “This new laboratory is a mirror of the facilities already within Sandia National Labs that have served as the platform for joint CERIAS and DOE research since 2017,” said Theresa Mayer, executive vice president for research and partnerships at Purdue University. “The opening of SOL4CE at Purdue allows us to increase both the speed and impact of our national security research collaboration with Sandia National Labs.”

IRIS and XSEDE to investigate the impact of research supercomputing

A partnership XSEDE and the Institute for Research on Innovation and Science (IRIS) will examine how access to advanced research computing resources and services available via XSEDE affect the collaboration networks and scientific productivity of participating researchers. “IRIS will link the IRIS UMETRICS dataset containing transaction-level administrative data on sponsored research projects from dozens of the nation’s leading higher educational institutions to data from XSEDE allocations. This will result in a new way to examine how access to supercomputers influences the way researchers collaborate with colleagues and the productivity of individuals and research teams.”

New Argonne etching technique could advance semiconductors

Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory have developed a new molecular layer etching technique that could potentially enable the manufacture of increasingly small microelectronics. “Our ability to control matter at the nanoscale is limited by the kinds of tools we have to add or remove thin layers of material. Molecular layer etching (MLE) is a tool to allow manufacturers and researchers to precisely control the way thin materials, at microscopic and nanoscales, are removed,” said lead author Matthias Young, an assistant professor at the University of Missouri and former postdoctoral researcher at Argonne.

Visualizing an Entire Brain at Nanoscale Resolution

In this video from SC19, Berkeley researchers visualizes an entire brain at nanoscale resolution. The work was published in the journal, Science. “At the core of the work is the combination of expansion microscopy and lattice light-sheet microscopy (ExLLSM) to capture large super-resolution image volumes of neural circuits using high-speed, nano-scale molecular microscopy.”