Sign up for our newsletter and get the latest HPC news and analysis.
Send me information from insideHPC:


Moving Radiology Forward with HPC at Boston Children’s Hospital

In this video from the Intel HPC Developer Conference, Simon Warfield from Boston Children’s Hospital describes how radiology is being transformed with 3D and 4D MRI technology powered by AI and HPC. “A complete Diffusion Compartment Imaging study can now be completed in 16 minutes on a workstation, which means Diffusion Compartment Imaging can now be used in emergency situations, in a clinical setting, and to evaluate the efficacy of treatment. Even better, higher resolution images can be produced because the optimized code scales.”

Supercomputing How First Supernovae Altered Early Star Formation

Over at LBNL, Kathy Kincade writes that cosmologists are using supercomputers to study how heavy metals expelled from exploding supernovae helped the first stars in the universe regulate subsequent star formation. “In the early universe, the stars were massive and the radiation they emitted was very strong,” Chen explained. “So if you have this radiation before that star explodes and becomes a supernova, the radiation has already caused significant damage to the gas surrounding the star’s halo.”

SDSC Earthquake Codes Used in 2017 Gordon Bell Prize Research

A Chinese team of researchers awarded this year’s prestigious Gordon Bell prize for simulating the devastating 1976 earthquake in Tangshan, China, used an open-source code developed by researchers at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at UC San Diego and San Diego State University (SDSU) with support from the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC). “We congratulate the researchers for their impressive innovations porting our earthquake software code, and in turn for advancing the overall state of seismic research that will have far-reaching benefits around the world,” said Yifeng Cui, director of SDSC’s High Performance Geocomputing Laboratory, who along with SDSU Geological Sciences Professor Kim Olsen, Professor Emeritus Steven Day and researcher Daniel Roten developed the AWP-ODC code.

Intel SC17 Booth Tour: Driving Innovation in HPC

In this video, David Warberg gives us a quick tour of the Intel booth at SC17. “Intel unveiled new HPC advancements for optimized workloads, including the the addition of a new family of HPC solutions to the Intel Select Solutions program. Built on the latest Intel Xeon Scalable platforms, Intel Select Solutions are verified configurations designed to speed and simplify the evaluation and deployment of data center infrastructure while meeting a high performance threshold.”

A New Way to Visualize Performance Optimization Tradeoffs

A valuable feature of Intel Advisor is its Roofline Analysis Chart, which provides an intuitive and powerful visualization of actual performance measured against hardware-imposed performance ceilings. Intel Advisor’s vector parallelism optimization analysis and memory-versus-compute roofline analysis, working together, offer a powerful tool for visualizing an application’s complete current and potential performance profile on a given platform.

Accelerating Cryo-EM with Intel Technologies

In this video from the Intel HPC Developer Conference, Erik Lindahl from Stockholm University describes the challenges of cryo-EM, a technique that fires beams of electrons at proteins that have been frozen in solution, to deduce the biomolecules’ structure. “Structural biology is going through a revolution where cryo-EM now determine 3D structures from 100,000s of noisy images, but it relies on very large computations. I will present our work with Intel to accelerate the RELION program with x86 SIMD, TBB, and MKL to provide outstanding performance.”

SC17 Preview: Molecular Simulation at the Mesoscale

SC17 will continue its HPC Matters Plenary session series this year a talk on Molecular Simulation at the Mesoscale. “We are developing new capabilities for multi-scale dynamic simulations that cross spatial scales from the molecular (angstrom) to cellular ultrastructure (near micron), and temporal scales from the picoseconds of macromolecular dynamics to the physiologically important time scales of organelles and cells (milliseconds to seconds).”

HPC Connects: The Search for Elusive Proteins that perform Gene Editing

In this video from the SC17 HPC Connects series, David Paez-Espino from the Joint Genome Institute describes how researchers are using supercomputing to search for elusive proteins that perform gene editing. “This revolutionary work requires petaflops of computing power to sift through billions of DNA sequences in the JGI data portals to identify proteins like Cas9 that, combined with the Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR), can “edit” a genome.”

Podcast: Optimizing Cosmos Code on Intel Xeon Phi

In this TACC podcast, Cosmos code developer Chris Fragile joins host Jorge Salazar for a discussion on how researchers are using supercomputers to simulate the inner workings of Black holes. “For this simulation, the manycore architecture of KNL presents new challenges for researchers trying to get the best compute performance. This is a computer chip that has lots of cores compared to some of the other chips one might have interacted with on other systems,” McDougall explained. “More attention needs to be paid to the design of software to run effectively on those types of chips.”

Visualizing with Software Rendering with Intel Xeon Phi

There are two main categories or uses where rendering on the Intel Xeon Phi processors should be investigated. The first is what could be called “Professional rendering” and the second, “Scientific visualization.” “Software based visualization, whether for photo-realistic rendering or scientific visualization can be accelerated with a software only approach. This allows for new algorithms to be implemented faster than waiting for the next generation of hardware systems to appear. As the number of computing elements increases, performance can increase as well.”