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Jonathan Poggie from Purdue Wins DoD Computing Award

Associate Professor Jonathan Poggie and his team from Purdue have received a large research grant from the U.S. Department of Defense for supercomputing resources. The award enables science and technology research that would not be possible without extraordinary computer resources. “Poggie is the principal investigator for a new U.S. Department of Defense high-performance computing modernization program beginning in October, entitled “Prediction of Hypersonic Laminar-Turbulent Transition through Direct Numerical Simulation.” The project is focused on making conventional hypersonic wind tunnels more useful for vehicle design by helping designers work through the noise and turbulence present in the tunnels and allowing them to more accurately interpret the results of the wind tunnel tests.”

Engility To Provide NOAA With HPC Expertise

Today Engility announced $14 million in task order awards from NOAA’s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory. Engility scientists will conduct HPC software development and optimization, help users gain scientific insights, and maintain cyber security controls on NOAA’s R&D High Performance Computing System. These services assist NOAA GFDL in enhancing and advancing their HPC capability to explore and understand climate and weather. “As we saw with Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, a deeper understanding of climate and weather are critical to America’s preparedness, infrastructure and security stance,” said Lynn Dugle, CEO of Engility. “Engility has been at the forefront of leveraging HPC to advance scientific discovery and solve the toughest engineering problems. HPC is, and will continue to be, an area of high interest and value among our customers as they seek to analyze huge and ever-expanding data sets.”

Exascale Computing to Accelerate Clean Fusion Energy

In this special guest feature, Jon Bashor from LBNL writes that Exascale computing will accelerate the push toward clean fusion energy. “Turning this from a promising technology into a mainstream scientific tool depends critically on high-performance, high-fidelity modeling of complex processes that develop over a wide range of space and time scales.”

Supercomputing Jet Noise for a Quieter World

Researchers at the University of Minnesota are using Argonne supercomputers to to look for new ways to reduce the noise produced by jet engines. Among the loudest sources of human-made noise that exist, jet engines can produce sound in excess of 130 decibels. “The University of Minnesota team developed a new method based on input-output analysis that can predict both the downstream noise and the sideline noise. While it was thought that the sideline noise was random, the input-output modes show coherent structure in the jet that is connected to the sideline noise, such that it can be predicted and controlled.”

HPC Reveals Glacial Flow

In this special guest feature from Scientific Computing World, Robert Roe looks at research from the University of Alaska that is using HPC to change the way we look at the movement of ice sheets. “The computational muscle behind this research project comes from the UAF’s Geophysical Institute which houses two HPC systems ‘Chinook’, an Intel based cluster from Penguin Computing and ‘Fish’ a Cray system installed in 2012 based on the Cray XK6m-200 that uses AMD processors.”

Job of the Week: Visualization Specialist at Pawsey Centre in Australia

The Pawsey Supercomputing Centre in Australia is seeking a Visualization Specialist in our Job of the Week. “As a member of the Data and Visualization team at the Pawsey Supercomputing Centre, the Visualization Specialist will support services related to visualization including providing guidance, expert advice and helping users in designing and implementing analysis and visualization workflows.”

Podcast: Mapping DNA at Near-Atomic Resolution with Cryo-EM

In this podcast, Berkeley Lab’s Eva Nogales describes how her team is using a new imaging technology that is yielding remarkably detailed 3-D models of complex biomolecules critical to DNA function. Using cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), Nogales and her colleagues have resolved the structure at near-atomic resolutions of a human transcription factor used in gene expression and DNA repair.

Mapping the Brain with the Theta Supercomputer

Researchers are using the Theta supercomputer at Argonne to map the intricate layout of brain neurons. “The basic goal is simple — would like to be able to image all of the neurons in the brain — but the datasets from X-rays and electron microscopes are extremely large,” said Doga Gursoy, assistant computational scientist in the X-Ray Science Division of Argonne’s Advanced Photon Source. They are at the tera- and petabyte scales. So we would like to use Theta to build the software and codebase infrastructure in order to analyze that data.”

Entering the Era of Simulation Driven Design

In this special guest feature, Robert Roe from Scientific Computing World reports from the European Altair Technology Conference and finds that simulation-driven design is taking center stage for the CAE industry. “Jim Scapa from Altair noted that Scapa noted that big data and the cloud will continue to play a significant role in the development and consumption of software and that manufacturing methods and materials science would continue to drive innovations – particularly in areas such as additive manufacturing and the design of composites.”

HPC Challenges in Simulating the World’s Most Powerful Tornados

“What makes this work significant is the use of supercomputing resources to produce simulations of supercells where data is saved with extremely high spatial and temporal resolution, and the use of visualization techniques (such as volume rendering and trajectory clouds) to produce video that exposes the highly variable flow features that occur throughout the life of the simulated storms. Some of these simulations contain long lived tornadoes producing near-surface winds exceeding 300 mph.”