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Call for Proposals: Aurora Early Science Program at Argonne

The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) is now accepting proposals for its Aurora Early Science Program (ESP) through September 2, 2016. The program will award computing time to 10 science teams to pursue innovative research as part of pre-production testing on the facility’s next-generation system. Aurora is a massively parallel, many-core Intel-Cray supercomputer that will deliver 18 times the computational performance of Mira, ALCF’s current production system.

DOE Awards 1.7 Billion Core-hours on Argonne Supercomputers

The ASCR Leadership Computing Challenge (ALCC) has awarded 26 projects a total of 1.7 billion core-hours at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF), a DOE Office of Science User Facility. The one-year awards began July 1.

Podcast: What a Supercomputer Does

In this WBEZ podcast, Katherine Riley from Argonne explains what a supercomputer does. “Argonne National Laboratory is celebrating its 70th anniversary. The science and engineering research center has had a prominent place in historical research developments. They’re currently in the process of installing their newewst supercomputer, Theta.”

Paul Messina on the New ECP Exascale Computing Project

Argonne Distinguished Fellow Paul Messina has been tapped to lead the Exascale Computing Project, heading a team with representation from the six major participating DOE national laboratories: Argonne, Los Alamos, Lawrence Berkeley, Lawrence Livermore, Oak Ridge and Sandia. The project will focus its efforts on four areas: Applications, Software, Hardware, and Exascale Systems.

Supercomputing Supernova Explosions on Mira

Researchers from Michigan State University are using the Mira supercomputer to perform large-scale 3-D simulations of the final moments of a supernova’s life cycle. While the 3-D simulation approach is still in its infancy, early results indicate that the models are providing a clearer picture than ever before of the mechanisms that drive supernova explosions.

Video: Developing, Configuring, Building, and Deploying HPC Software

“The process of developing HPC software requires consideration of issues in software design as well as practices that support the collaborative writing of well-structured code that is easy to maintain, extend, and support. This presentation will provide an overview of development environments and how to configure, build, and deploy HPC software using some of the tools that are frequently used in the community.”

Slimming Down Supercomputer Power Bills

Any performance improvements that could be wrung out of supercomputers by adding more power have long been exhausted. New supercomputers demand new options that will give scientists a sleek, efficient partner in making new discoveries such as the new supercomputer called Summit that’s being developed and is to arrive at Oak Ridge National Lab in the next couple of years. “If necessity is the mother of invention, we’ll have some inventions happening soon,” says deputy division director of Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Susan Coghlan.

Supercomputing van der Waals Forces on Mira

Over at ALCF, Katie Jones writes that researchers are using the Mira supercomputer to validate a new “wave-like” model of the van der Waals force—a weak attraction that has strong ties to function and stability in materials and biological systems.

Call for Proposals: ALCF Data Science Program

The 2016 ALCF Data Science Program (ADSP) at Argonne has issued its Call for Proposals. The new initiative is targeted at “big data” science problems that require the scale and performance of leadership resources. “Our goal is to help explore and improve a variety of computational methods that will help enable data-driven discoveries across all scientific disciplines,” said ALCF Director of Science Katherine Riley.

Paving the Way for Theta and Aurora

In this special guest feature, John Kirkley writes that Argonne is already building code for their future Theta and Aurora supercomputers based on Intel Knights Landing. “One of the ALCF’s primary tasks is to help prepare key applications for two advanced supercomputers. One is the 8.5-petaflops Theta system based on the upcoming Intel® Xeon Phi™ processor, code-named Knights Landing (KNL) and due for deployment this year. The other is a larger 180-petaflops Aurora supercomputer scheduled for 2018 using Intel Xeon Phi processors, code-named Knights Hill. A key goal is to solidify libraries and other essential elements, such as compilers and debuggers that support the systems’ current and future production applications.”