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Podcast: Astronomers Turn to AI as New Telescopes Come Online

In this AI Podcast, Brant Robertson from UC Santa Cruz describes how astronomers are turning to AI to turn the vast quantities of data that will be pouring out of next-generation telescopes into world-changing scientific discoveries. “Good news: astronomers are getting new tools to let them see further, better than ever before. The bad news: they’ll soon be getting more data than humans can handle.”

Handling and Processing Data from the Cherenkov Telescope Array

Etienne Lyard from the University of Geneva, Switzerland presents: Handling and Processing Data from the Cherenkov Telescope Array.
gave this talk at PASC18. “The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) will be the world’s largest and most sensitive high-energy gamma-ray observatory. Composed of more than 100 telescopes of different sizes between 4 and 23 meters in diameter, it will operate from two separate sites in Chile and at the Canary Islands. It will generate up to 10PB of raw data per year that will be stored in a distributed archive. This talk will outline the current status, plans and challenges that we face to implement the analysis and data  pipeline of CTA.”

Extreme Computing for Extreme Adaptive Optics: The Key to Finding Life Outside our Solar System

Hatem Ltaief from KAUST gave this talk at PASC18. “The real-time correction of telescopic images in the search for exoplanets is highly sensitive to atmospheric aberrations. The pseudo-inverse algorithm is an efficient mathematical method to filter out these turbulences. We introduce a new partial singular value decomposition (SVD) algorithm based on QR-based Diagonally Weighted Halley (QDWH) iteration for the pseudo-inverse method of adaptive optics. The pseudo-inverse simulation code will be deployed on-sky for the Subaru telescope during observation nights scheduled early 2018.”

Supercomputing and the Search for Supernovae

In this video, Berkeley Lab’s Peter Nugent presents: “Supercomputing and the search for supernovae.” The talk was part of the Eight Big Ideas night, where eight Berkeley Lab scientists presented eight game-changing concepts in eight minutes each.