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Searching for Human Brain Memory Molecules with the Piz Daint Supercomputer

Scientists at the University of Basel are using the Piz Daint supercomputer at CSCS to discover interrelationships in the human genome that might simplify the search for “memory molecules” and eventually lead to more effective medical treatment for people with diseases that are accompanied by memory disturbance. “Until now, searching for genes related to memory capacity has been comparable to seeking out the proverbial needle in a haystack.”

HPC Connects: How Supercomputers Are Unraveling the Mystery of the Human Brain

In this video from SC17, Katrin Amunts from Jülich highlights how the massive European-based Human Brain Project (HBP), comprising a veritable orchestra of scientists, collaborates to deliver the most exquisitely detailed human brain models ever created. “We have to create an ‘atlas’ (of the brain) that has a very large size in terms and bits and bytes,” Amunts said.

Mapping the Brain with the Theta Supercomputer

Researchers are using the Theta supercomputer at Argonne to map the intricate layout of brain neurons. “The basic goal is simple — would like to be able to image all of the neurons in the brain — but the datasets from X-rays and electron microscopes are extremely large,” said Doga Gursoy, assistant computational scientist in the X-Ray Science Division of Argonne’s Advanced Photon Source. They are at the tera- and petabyte scales. So we would like to use Theta to build the software and codebase infrastructure in order to analyze that data.”

Keynotes Announced for Intel HPC Developer Conference at SC16

The Intel HPC Developer Conference at SC16 has announced its keynote speakers. Jonathan Cohen and Kai Li from Princeton will present, Going Where Neuroscience and Computer Science Have Not Gone Before. “Taking place Nov. 12-13 in Salt Lake City, the Intel HPC Developer Conference will bring together developers from around the world to discuss code modernization in high-performance computing.”

PSC Powers 3D-Reconstruction of Excitatory Visual Neuron Wiring

With help from the Pittsburgh Supercomputer Center, an international team of researchers has published the largest network to date of connections between neurons in the cortex, where high-level processing occurs, and have revealed several crucial elements of how networks in the brain are organized. The results are published this week in the journal Nature.