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HPC Reveals Glacial Flow

In this special guest feature from Scientific Computing World, Robert Roe looks at research from the University of Alaska that is using HPC to change the way we look at the movement of ice sheets. “The computational muscle behind this research project comes from the UAF’s Geophysical Institute which houses two HPC systems ‘Chinook’, an Intel based cluster from Penguin Computing and ‘Fish’ a Cray system installed in 2012 based on the Cray XK6m-200 that uses AMD processors.”

Video: Introduction to the Cheyenne Supercomputer

Cheyenne is a new 5.34-petaflops, high-performance computer built for NCAR by SGI. Cheyenne be a critical tool for researchers across the country studying climate change, severe weather, geomagnetic storms, seismic activity, air quality, wildfires, and other important geoscience topics. In this video, Brian Vanderwende from UCAR describes typical workflows in the NCAR/CISL Cheyenne HPC environment as well as performance […]

NASA Optimizes Climate Impact Research with Cycle Computing

Today Cycle Computing announced its continued involvement in optimizing research spearheaded by NASA’s Center for Climate Simulation (NCCS) and the University of Minnesota. Currently, a biomass measurement effort is underway in a coast-to-coast band of Sub-Saharan Africa. An over 10 million square kilometer region of Africa’s trees, a swath of acreage bigger than the entirety […]

How HPC is Helping Solve Climate and Weather Forecasting Challenges

Data accumulation is just one of the challenges facing today weather and climatology researchers and scientists. To understand and predict Earth’s weather and climate, they rely on increasingly complex computer models and simulations based on a constantly growing body of data from around the globe. “It turns out that in today’s HPC technology, the moving of data in and out of the processing units is more demanding in time than the computations performed. To be effective, systems working with weather forecasting and climate modeling require high memory bandwidth and fast interconnect across the system, as well as a robust parallel file system.”

HPC Helps Drive Climate Change Modeling

Because of the complexity involved, the length of the simulation period, and the amounts of data generated, weather prediction and climate modeling on a global basis requires some of the most powerful computers in the world. The models incorporate topography, winds, temperatures, radiation, gas emission, cloud forming, land and sea ice, vegetation, and more. However, although weather prediction and climate modeling make use of a common numerical methods, the items they compute differ.

HPC Helps Drive Weather Forecasting

The computational requirements for weather forecasting are driven by the need for higher resolution models for more accurate and extended forecasts. In addition, more physics and chemistry processes are included in the models so we can observe the very fine features of weather behavior. These models operate on 3D grids that encompass the globe. The closer the points on the grid are to each other, the more accurate the results.

insideHPC Special Report on HPC Weather Forecasting and Climate Research

In the pantheon of HPC grand challenges, weather forecasting and long term climate simulation rank right up there with the most complex and computationally demanding problems in astrophysics, aeronautics, fusion power, exotic materials, and earthquake prediction, to name just a few. This special reports looks at how HPC takes on the challenge of global weather forecasting and climate research.

Research Demands More Compute Power and Faster Storage for Complex Computational Applications

Many Universities, private research labs and government research agencies have begun using High Performance Computing (HPC) servers, compute accelerators and flash storage arrays to accelerate a wide array of research among disciplines in math, science and engineering. These labs utilize GPUs for parallel processing and flash memory for storing large datasets. Many universities have HPC labs that are available for students and researchers to share resources in order to analyze and store vast amounts of data more quickly.

This Week in HPC: DOE Labs Come Together on Climate and Latest Cuda Escalates ARMs Race

In this episode of This Week in HPC, Michael Feldman and Addison Snell from Intersect360 Research discuss the ACME collaboration for climate research. In Part 2, they look at the latest Cuda release with with support for 64-bit ARM processors.