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Speakers Announced for PASC18 in Basel

The PASC18 conference has posted their conference speaker agenda. Registration is now open for this HPC event, which takes place July 2-4 in Basel, Switzerland. “PASC18 offers three days of stimulating technical sessions with more than 200 talks in total. The program includes keynote presentations, minisymposia, peer-reviewed papers, posters, an interdisciplinary dialogue, and a panel discussion.”

David Bader from Georgia Tech Joins PASC18 Speaker Lineup

Today PASC18 announced that this year’s Public Lecture will be held by David Bader from Georgia Tech. Dr. Bader will speak on Massive-Scale Analytics Applied to Real-World Problems. “Emerging real-world graph problems include: detecting and preventing disease in human populations; revealing community structure in large social networks; and improving the resilience of the electric power grid. Unlike traditional applications in computational science and engineering, solving these social problems at scale often raises new challenges because of the sparsity and lack of locality in the data, the need for research on scalable algorithms and development of frameworks for solving these real-world problems on high performance computers, and for improved models that capture the noise and bias inherent in the torrential data streams. This talk will discuss the opportunities and challenges in massive data-intensive computing for applications in social sciences, physical sciences, and engineering.”

Video: Sonifying Simulations

Scientists typically understand data through graphs and visualizations. But is it possible to use sound to interpret complex information? This video from Georgia Tech’s Asegun Henry shows the Sonification of the vibrations of an atom in crystalline silicon. “If you look at the data, it looks like white noise,” Henry said. “We decided to sonify the data, and as soon as we listened to it, we could hear the pattern.”

DOE Funds Asynchronous Supercomputing Research at Georgia Tech

“More than just building bigger and faster computers, high-performance computing is about how to build the algorithms and applications that run on these computers,” said School of Computational Science and Engineering (CSE) Associate Professor Edmond Chow. “We’ve brought together the top people in the U.S. with expertise in asynchronous techniques as well as experience needed to develop, test, and deploy this research in scientific and engineering applications.”