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New HPCG Benchmark List Goes Beyond LINPACK to Compare Supercomputers

The High Performance Conjugate Gradients (HPCG) Benchmark list was announced this week at SC15. This is the fourth list produced for the emerging benchmark designed to complement the traditional High Performance LINPACK (HPL) benchmark used as the official metric for ranking the TOP500 systems. The first HPCG list was announced at ISC’14 a year and a half ago, containing only 15 entries and the SC’14 list had 25. The current list contains more than 60 entries as HPCG continues to gain traction in the HPC community.

How to Measure a Supercomputer’s Speed?

In this special guest feature from Scientific Computing World, Adrian Giordani asks what benchmarks should be applied as the nature of supercomputing changes on the way to exascale.

Pleiades Supercomputer Moves Up the Ranks with Haswell

NASA reports that it’s newly upgraded Pleiades supercomputer ranks number 11 on the July 2015 TOP500 list of the most powerful supercomputers. And while the LINPACK computing power of Pleiades jumped nearly 21 percent, its ranking at number 5 on the new HPCG benchmark list reflects its ability to tackle real world applications.

Latest HPCG Performance List Complements TOP500

The latest High Performance Conjugate Gradients (HPCG) Benchmark list will be announced in a special session this week at ISC 2015. This is the third list produced for the emerging benchmark designed to complement the traditional High Performance Linpack (HPL) benchmark used as the official metric for ranking the Top 500 systems.

Optimizing the HPCG Benchmark on GPUs

“Over at the Parallel for All Blog, Everett Phillips and Massimiliano Fatica write that GPUs offer good acceleration on the new HPCG benchmark that has been designed to augment Linpack as a measure of performance for the TOP500. Their GPU porting strategy focused on parallelizing the Symmetric Gauss-Seidel smoother (SYMGS), which accounts for approximately two thirds of the benchmark flops.”