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NREL Report Evaluates LiquidCool Solutions for the Datacenter

NREL researchers are testing immersive liquid cooling technologies that could potentially bring huge energy savings to HPC datacenters. With worldwide datacenters consuming an estimated 70 billion kWh per year, a disruptive energy-saving solution is needed, and a liquid-submerged server (LSS) technology from LiquidCool Solutions might be the answer. “The testing confirmed that the LSS technology could not only maintain target temperatures under heavy computational load, but that the hot liquid could be used to heat buildings more efficiently than NREL’s current solution.”

LiquidCool Solutions Technical Evaluation

LiquidCool Solutions has developed a liquid submerged server (LSS) technology that changes the way computer electronics are cooled. The technology provides an option to cool electronics by the direct contact flow of dielectric fluid (coolant) into a sealed enclosure housing all the electronics of a single server. The intimate dielectric fluid contact with electronics improves the effectiveness of heat removal from the electronics.

LCS to Unveil Immersive-cooled Servers at SC16

Today LiquidCool Solutions (LCS) announced plans to unveil two new liquid submerged servers at SC16 in Salt Lake City. Based on a clamshell design, the SCS Submerged Cloud Server is a 2U 4-node server designed for Cloud-computing applications. The SGS, Submerged GPU Server, is a 2U dual node server designed for HPC applications that can be equipped with four GPU cards or four Xeon Phi boards. Both servers are completely fanless and require no mechanical refrigeration for cooling.

LiquidCool Solutions Launches Newest Technology at SC15

Today LiquidCool Solutions (LCS) announced plans to launch its newest technology – the Clamshell – at SC15 in Austin. As a rack-based server, the Clamshell is low-cost and flexible enough to meet Open Compute Project design standards.

Innovation Keeps Supercomputers Cool

“The range of cooling options now available is testimony to engineering ingenuity. HPC centers can choose between air, oil, dielectric fluid, or water as the heat-transfer medium. Opting for something other than air means that single or two-phase flow could be available, opening up the possibilities of convective or evaporative cooling and thus saving the cost of pumping the fluid round the system.”