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Arm Throwing Elbows: LRZ to Deploy Arm-based HPE Cray CS500

It’s been a good week for Arm: the Fugaku supercomputer at Japan’s Riken research center was named no. 1 on the TOP500 listing of the world’s most powerful HPC systems, and today, the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ) in Munich announced it will deploy HPE’s Cray CS500 with Fujitsu A64FX chips based on the Arm architecture – the same processor used in Fugaku (and then there’s Apple switching from x86 for new Arm chips).

GCS Centres in Germany support COVID-19 research with HPC

Epidemiologists have turned to the power of supercomputers to model and predict how the disease spreads at local and regional levels in hopes of forecasting potential new hot spots and guiding policy makers’ decisions in containing the disease’s spread. GCS is supporting several projects focused on these goals. “”Our workflows are perfectly scalable in the sense that the number of calculations we can perform is directly proportional to the number of cores available.”

ICHEC to develop quantum circuit simulation tools for Europe’s largest supercomputers

Today the Irish Centre for High-End Computing (ICHEC) announced that it is leading a novel quantum simulation project in collaboration with partners at the Leibniz Supercomputing centre (LRZ) to develop quantum simulation tools for Europe’s largest supercomputers. “While actual quantum computing is still some way off, the simulation tools we are creating will advance the necessary concepts and skill-sets for quantum programming,” said Dr Niall Moran, Principal Investigator and project leader of the PRACE WP8 QuantEx project at ICHEC. “This work is being conducted with world-class research teams across a number of Irish third-level institutions and will contribute to preparing Ireland for Quantum programming.”

Visualizing the World’s Largest Turbulence Simulation

In this visualization, LRZ presents the largest interstellar turbulence simulations ever performed, unravelling key astrophysical processes concerning the formation of stars and the relative role of magnetic fields. “Besides revealing features of turbulence with an unprecedented resolution, the visualizations brilliantly showcase the stretching-and-folding mechanisms through which astrophysical processes such as supernova explosions drive turbulence and amplify the magnetic field in the interstellar gas, and how the first structures, the seeds of newborn stars are shaped by this process.”

LRZ in Germany joins the OpenMP effort

The Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ) in Germany has joined the OpenMP Architecture Review Board (ARB), a group of leading hardware and software vendors and research organizations creating the standard for the most popular shared-memory parallel programming model in use today. “With the rise of core counts and the expected future deployment of accelerated systems, optimizing node-level performance is getting more and more important. As a member of the OpenMP ARB, we want to contribute to the future of OpenMP to meet the challenges of new architectures“, says Prof. Dieter Kranzlmüller, Chairman of the Board of Directors of LRZ.

Video: Lenovo Leads the TOP500 with Innovative HPC Cooling Technologies

In this video from SC18 in Dallas, Scott Tease from Lenovo describes how the company is leading the TOP500 with innovative HPC cooling technologies. “At #8 on the TOP500, the Lenovo-built, hot-water cooled SuperMUC system at the LRZ in Germany is one of the most power efficient supercomputers on the planet. With more than 241,000 cores and a combined peak performance of the two installation phases of more than 6.8 Petaflops.”

Intel Powers SuperMUC-NG Supercomputer at LRZ in Germany

In this video from SC18 in Dallas, Dieter Kranzlmueller from LRZ in Germany describes how Intel powers the SuperMUC-NG supercomputer. “The 19.4 Petaflop machine ranks number 8 among the fastest supercomputers in the world. SuperMUC-NG is in its start-up phase, and will be ready for full production runs in 2019. The machine, build in partnership with Lenovo and Intel, has a theoretical peak of 26.9 petaflops, and is comprised of 6,400 compute nodes based on Intel Xeon Scalable processors.”

GCS in Germany Grants 816 Million Core Hours to Science

Today the Gauss Centre for Supercomputing’s (GCS) in Germany awarded 816.3 million core hours as part of the organization’s 20th Call for Large-Scale Projects. The computing time grants support national research activities from the fields of Computational and Scientific Engineering (351.3 million core hours), Astrophysics (247.5 million core hours), and High Energy Physics (217.5 million core hours).

300K-Core SuperMUC-NG System Launches at LRZ in Germany

LRZ in Germany dedicated their new SuperMUC-NG (“next generation”) supercomputer last week in Munich. Built by Lenovo, the massive system uses innovative hot-water cooling to achieve unprecedented computational power for large-scale scientific and engineering simulations.

Prof. Dieter Kranzlmueller to showcase SuperMUC-NG Supercomputer at Event in Caserta

Prof. Dieter Kranzlmueller from LRZ will give a talk entitled “Smart Scaling for High Performance Computing: SuperMUC-NG at the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre.” The event takes place Monday, June 4 at the University of Campania in Caserta, Italy. “The SuperMUC-NG supercomputer will deliver a staggering 26.7 petaflop compute capacity powered by nearly 6,500 nodes of Lenovo’s recently-announced, next-generation ThinkSystem SD650 servers.”