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HPE at ISC: ‘Perform Like a Supercomputer, Run Like a Cloud’

Since we last saw HPE at ISC a year ago, the company embarked on a strong run of success in HPC and supercomputing – successes the company will no doubt be happy to discuss at virtual ISC 2021. This being the year of exascale, HPE is likely to put toward the top of its list […]

Super-expensive Supercomputers: UK Met Office in £1B+ Deal for Microsoft Weather System; $3B System in China on Way

As widely reported in February, the UK Met Office and Microsoft have come to an agreement to provision a £1.2 billion (over 10 years) supercomputer the Met Office said will be the world’s most powerful weather and climate forecasting system. The agreement, announced on Earth Day, will be in the top 25 of the Top500 […]

UK Denies Atos Charges in Microsoft’s $1.2B Weather Supercomputer Contract Win

In the aftermath of Microsoft’s win of a mammoth, £854 million ($1.2 billion) weather supercomputing contract from the British government, the UK Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) is fending off a lawsuit by Atos, which lost its bid, charging the government with “breaching public law duties,” according to a report in the […]

UK to invest £1.2 billion for Supercomputing Weather and Climate Science

Today the UK announced plans to invest £1.2 billion for the world’s most powerful weather and climate supercomputer. The government investment will replace Met Office supercomputing capabilities over a 10-year period from 2022 to 2032. The current Met Office Cray supercomputers reach their end of life in late 2022. The first phase of the new supercomputer will increase the Met Office computing capacity by 6-fold alone.”

PSyclone Software Eases Weather and Climate Forecasting

“PSyclone was developed for the UK Met Office and is now a part of the build system for Dynamo, the dynamical core currently in development for the Met Office’s ‘next generation’ weather and climate model software. By generating the complex code needed to make use of thousands of processors, PSyclone leaves the Met Office scientists free to concentrate on the science aspects of the model. This means that they will not have to change their code from something that works on a single processing unit (or core) to something that runs on many thousands of cores.”