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NOAA seeks proposals to help develop world’s best weather forecast model

NOAA is seeking a technology partner to help design and build the Earth Prediction Innovation Center (EPIC). This extramural center will accelerate scientific research and engineering to create the world’s most accurate and reliable operational weather forecast model. “Through EPIC, the United States has a unique opportunity to harness the talents of the most brilliant modelers in the world to advance operational global numerical weather prediction,” said Neil Jacobs, Ph.D., acting NOAA administrator.

NOAA to triple weather and climate supercomputing capacity

The United States is reclaiming a global top spot in high performance computing to support weather and climate forecasts. NOAA, part of the Department of Commerce, today announced a significant upgrade to compute capacity, storage space, and interconnect speed of its Weather and Climate Operational Supercomputing System. This upgrade keeps the agency’s supercomputing capacity on par with other leading weather forecast centers around the world.

Orion Supercomputer comes to Mississippi State University

Today Mississippi State University and the NOAA celebrated one of the country’s most powerful supercomputers with a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the Orion supercomputer, the fourth-fastest computer system in U.S. academia. Funded by NOAA and managed by MSU’s High Performance Computing Collaboratory, the Orion system is powering research and development advancements in weather and climate modeling, autonomous systems, materials, cybersecurity, computational modeling and more.

Job of the Week: Scientific Programmer at Redline Performance Solutions

RedLine is seeking a a Scientific Programmer/Analyst – MRMS candidate(s) to support the Implementation and Data Services Branch (IDSB) in the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Central Operations (NCO). The IDSB supports the implementation, maintenance, and Tier-2 support of the operational production suite on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) HPC systems and of the applications on NOAA’s Integrated Dissemination Program (IDP) systems.

Video: Advancing U.S. Weather Prediction Capabilities with Exascale HPC

Mark Govett from NOAA gave this talk at the GPU Technology Conference. “We’ll discuss the revolution in computing, modeling, data handling and software development that’s needed to advance U.S. weather-prediction capabilities in the exascale computing era. Creating prediction models to cloud-resolving 1 KM-resolution scales will require an estimated 1,000-10,000 times more computing power, but existing models can’t exploit exascale systems with millions of processors. We’ll examine how weather-prediction models must be rewritten to incorporate new scientific algorithms, improved software design, and use new technologies such as deep learning to speed model execution, data processing, and information processing.”

NOAA and NCAR team up for Weather and Climate Modeling

The United States is making exciting changes to how computer models will be developed in the future to support the nation’s weather and climate forecast system. NOAA and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) have joined forces to help the nation’s weather and climate modeling scientists achieve mutual benefits through more strategic collaboration, shared resources and information.

NOAA Report: Effects of Persistent Arctic Warming Continue to Mount

NOAA is out with their 2018 Arctic Report Card and the news is not good, folks. Issued annually since 2006, the Arctic Report Card is a timely and peer-reviewed source for clear, reliable and concise environmental information on the current state of different components of the Arctic environmental system relative to historical records. “The Report Card is intended for a wide audience, including scientists, teachers, students, decision-makers and the general public interested in the Arctic environment and science.”

NOAA Looks to Dell for Massive Supercomputing Upgrade

Today NOAA announced to plans for a major upgrade to its supercomputing capabilities. The upgrade adds 2.8 petaflops of computational power, enabling NOAA’s National Weather Service to implement the next generation Global Forecast System, known as the “American Model,” next year. “Having more computing speed and capacity positions us to collect and process even more data from our newest satellites — GOES-East, NOAA-20 and GOES-S — to meet the growing information and decision-support needs of our emergency management partners, the weather industry and the public.”

Engility To Provide NOAA With HPC Expertise

Today Engility announced $14 million in task order awards from NOAA’s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory. Engility scientists will conduct HPC software development and optimization, help users gain scientific insights, and maintain cyber security controls on NOAA’s R&D High Performance Computing System. These services assist NOAA GFDL in enhancing and advancing their HPC capability to explore and understand climate and weather. “As we saw with Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, a deeper understanding of climate and weather are critical to America’s preparedness, infrastructure and security stance,” said Lynn Dugle, CEO of Engility. “Engility has been at the forefront of leveraging HPC to advance scientific discovery and solve the toughest engineering problems. HPC is, and will continue to be, an area of high interest and value among our customers as they seek to analyze huge and ever-expanding data sets.”

Top Weather and Climate Sites run on DDN Storage

“DDN’s unique ability to handle tough application I/O profiles at speed and scale gives weather and climate organizations the infrastructure they need for rapid, high-fidelity modeling,” said Laura Shepard, senior director of product marketing, DDN. “These capabilities are essential to DDN’s growing base of weather and climate organizations, which are at the forefront of scientific research and advancements – from whole climate atmospheric and oceanic modeling to hurricane and severe weather emergency preparedness to the use of revolutionary, new, high-resolution satellite imagery in weather forecasting.”