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Offloading vs. Onloading: The Case of CPU Utilization

One of the primary conversations these days in the field of networking is whether it is better to onload network functions onto the CPU or better to offload these functions to the interconnect hardware. “Onloading interconnect technology is easier to build, but the issue becomes the CPU utilization; because the CPU must manage and execute network operations, it has less availability for applications, which is its primary purpose.”

Salt Lake City Guide – A Wonder of the West

With the SC conference returning to Salt Lake City next week, we’d like to share some of the reasons why we think SLC is one of the most underrated American cities.

Local’s Guide to Food & Entertainment at SC16 in Salt Lake City

SC16 returns to Salt Lake City this year. And while SLC is known for its gorgeous views of the mountains, what our readers may not know is that Salt Lake City is full of Hip, yes hip restaurants, cafes, bars, and things to see and do. “In this feature from the Print ‘n Fly Guide Guide to SC16 in Salt Lake City, we offer you some great restaurant recommendations from the locals. Plus, we’ll tell you where to get great cigars, a day at the spa, and more.”

Radio Free HPC Does the Day-by-Day SC16 Preview Show

In this podcast, the Radio Free HPC team previews the ancillary events around SC16 in Salt Lake City. With a full week in store, this could be the best conference yet. After our event roundup, they share their predictions for SC16 total attendance numbers.

Changing the Face of the SC Conference Series: An Interview with SC16 General Chair John West

“SC16 is really unique among conferences in the HPC community. There is simply no other conference where you can go to talk with every major participant in the HPC vendor community, see the latest research results, get HPC-specific training from the authorities in our field, mentor that next generation of leaders, and attend workshops that will shape tomorrow’s technology agenda.”

Paving the Road to Exascale with Co-Design Architecture

In this special guest feature from the Print’n Fly Guide to SC15 in Austin, Scot Schultz from Mellanox writes that a new era of Co-Design will pave the way to Exascale. “Exascale computing will undoubtedly include three primary concepts: heterogeneous systems, direct communication through a more sophisticated intelligent network, and backward/forward compatibility. Co-Design includes these concepts in order to create an evolutionary architectural approach that will enable Exascale-class systems.”

SC15 HPC Transforms – but how, what, where, when, why and for whom?

In this special guest feature from the Print’nFly Guide to SC15 in Austin, Peter ffoulkes from OrionX looks at how HPC Transforms. “If we thought the last five years were disruptive, we may not have seen anything yet, and in many ways the HPC community will continue to lead that transformation, even if it does not always receive recognition for that leadership. The general enterprise market shift towards a data-centric focus, based upon “big-data”, the impending deluge of sensor data from “The Internet of Things”, and real-time analytics using in-memory databases could be the best thing that has happened to the HPC community in decades.”

It’s Here: The Print ‘n Fly Guide to SC15 in Austin

At insideHPC, are very pleased to publish the Print ‘n Fly Guide to SC15 in Austin. We designed this Guide to be an in-flight magazine custom tailored for your journey to SC15 — the world’s largest gathering of high performance computing professionals.

An Open Letter from Intel’s Raj Hazra: Entering the Era of Code Modernization

In this introduction letter to the Print ‘n Fly Guide to SC14 New Orleans, Intel’s Raj Hazra describes the grand challenge of code modernization that faces the HPC community.

Intel Xeon Phi Takes DownUnder GeoSolutions to New Depths

Use of the Intel Xeon Phi coprocessors has allowed DUG to quickly adapt its existing code and pass this value on to its customers. Overall, the new environment provides DUG with an added compute capacity of roughly six peak petaflops.