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Video Replay: SC17 Keynote Presentation on the SKA Telescope Project

We are very excited to present this live keynote presentation on the SKA Telescope Project live from SC17. It all starts here Tuesday, Nov 14 at 8:30am Mountain Time. “Professor Diamond, accompanied by Dr. Rosie Bolton, SKA Regional Centre Project Scientist, will take SC17 attendees around the globe and out into the deepest reaches of the observable universe as they describe the SKA’s international partnership that will map and study the entire sky in greater detail than ever before.”

DDN Powers Radio Astronomy at Pawsey Centre in Australia

Today DDN announced that Pawsey Supercomputing Centre in Western Australia has deployed a pair of DDN GRIDScaler parallel file system appliances to help deliver the first colored panoramic view of the universe. “The GRIDScaler solution comprises 5PBs of storage as well as an additional 2PBs of DDN capacity to support diverse research, simulations and visualizations in radio astronomy, renewable energy and geosciences, among several other scientific disciplines. At Pawsey, DDN’s GRIDScaler delivers the performance and stability needed to address 50 large data collections and contribute towards scientific outcomes for some of the thousand scientists who benefit from Pawsey services.”

Firing up a Continent with HPC

In this special guest feature from Scientific Computing World, Nox Moyake describes the process of entrenching and developing HPC in South Africa. “The CHPC currently has about 1,000 users; most are in academia and others in industry. The centre supports research from across a number of domains and participates in a number of grand international projects such at the CERN and the SKA projects.”

SKA and CERN Sign Big Data Agreement

“The signature of this collaboration agreement between two of the largest producers of science data on the planet shows that we are really entering a new era of science worldwide”, said Prof. Philip Diamond, SKA Director-General. “Both CERN and SKA are and will be pushing the limits of what is possible technologically, and by working together and with industry, we are ensuring that we are ready to make the most of this upcoming data and computing surge.”

Leaping Forward in Energy Efficiency with the DOME 64-bit μDataCenter

In this slidecast, Ronald P. Luijten from IBM Research in Zurich presents: DOME 64-bit μDataCenter. “I like to call it a data­cen­ter in a shoe­box. With the com­bi­na­tion of power and ener­gy ef­fi­cien­cy, we be­lieve the mi­cro­serv­er will be of in­te­rest be­yond the DOME pro­ject, par­tic­u­lar­ly for cloud data centers and Big Data ana­ly­tics ap­pli­ca­tions.”

Interview: Peter Braam on How Campaign Storage Bridges the Small & Big, Fast & Slow

Peter Braam is well-known in the HPC Community for his early work with Lustre and other projects like the SKA telescope Science Data Processor. As one of the featured speakers at the upcoming MSST Mass Storage Conference, Braam will describe how his Campaign Storage Startup provides tools for massive parallel data movement between the new low cost, industry standard campaign storage tiers with premium storage for performance or availability.

Memory-Driven Near-Data Acceleration and its Application to DOME/SKA

In this video from the 2014 HPC User Forum in Seattle, Jan van Lunteren from IBM Research Labs in Zurich presents: Memory-Driven Near-Data Acceleration.

Video: The SKA Project – The World’s Largest Streaming Data Processor

The Square Kilometre Array Design Studies are an international effort to investigate and develop technologies which will enable us to build an enormous radio astronomy telescope with a million square meters of collecting area.

HPC and Exascale for the SKA Telescope

Bill Boas from Cray presented this talk at the Stanford HPC & Exascale Conference. “The SKA Telescope project entered its pre-construction design and engineering planning phase on December 1, 2013. Once fully constructed a decade from now, there will be 2500 dish antennae in South Africa and 100s of thousands of di-pole antennae in Western Australia, combining to create the world’s largest radio telescope and requiring the most data ever captured, processed, and archived that man has ever conceived.”