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Advanced Computing: HPC and RDS at University of Bristol

Simon Burbidge from the University of Bristol gave this talk at the HPC User Forum. “Our research focuses on the application of heterogeneous and many-core computing to solve large-scale scientific problems. Related research problems we are addressing include: performance portability across many-core devices; automatic optimization of many-core codes; communication-avoiding algorithms for massive scale systems; and fault tolerance software techniques for resiliency at scale.”

HPE Teams with University of Bristol for ARM-based HPC

Today the University of Bristol announced an initiative to accelerate the adoption of
ARM-based supercomputers in the UK. “HPE is excited to work with Arm, SUSE, and other key partners to offer the HPC community a fresh alternative for high performance computing which we believe will stimulate the industry to develop increasingly performant and efficient supercomputing solutions. By investing in this deployment through the Catalyst UK programme, HPE and our partners will drive both digital transformation and sustainable economic growth through new innovation and scientific discovery.”

First Public Disclosure of Isambard Supercomputer Performance Results

Prof. Simon McIntosh-Smith from the University of Bristol gave this talk at the GoingARM Workshop. “Isambard is a unique system that will enable direct ‘apples-to-apples’ comparisons across architectures, thus enabling UK scientists to better understand which architecture best suits their application.”

OCF Deploys 600 Teraflop Cluster at University of Bristol

OCF in the UK has deployed a new 600 teraflop supercomputer at the University of Bristol. Designed, integrated, and configured by OCF, the system is the largest of any UK university by core count. “Early benchmarking is showing that the new system is three times faster than our previous cluster.”

Simulating Jellyfish Blooms to Protect Coastal Power Stations

Scientists at the University of Bristol are working with the energy industry to develop an ‘early warning tool’ to predict jellyfish blooms that can cause serious problems by clogging the water intakes of coastal power plants. “To achieve this we will be translating previous research using a state-of-the-art marine dispersal modeling system to simulate the transport of jellyfish blooms by ocean currents, incorporating specific biological behaviors of jellyfish.”