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Video: Why We Need More Women in HPC

In this video, Dr. Toni Collis from the Women in HPC community presents: The Importance of Grace and Why We Need More Women in HPC. “The underrepresentation of women is a challenge that the entire supercomputing industry faces. Research shows that diverse teams increase productivity, and yet HPC still struggles to attract and retain female users. “

Interview: Women in HPC to Host Special Events at ISC 2016

This week, the Women in HPC organization announced a series of special events coming up at ISC 2016. To learn more, we caught up with WHPC Director Dr. Toni Collis from EPCC at the University of Edinburgh. “Most people don’t notice how un-diverse HPC really is. But when you start counting the number of women in the room, at the table, or in the C-suite, it is quite surprising.”

EuroMPI Conference Partners with Women in HPC to Bolster Diversity

Over at the Women in HPC Blog, Daniel Holmes from EPCC writes that the EuroMPI Conference is partnering with Women in HPC to increase diversity in high performance computing.

ISC 2016 Keynote to Showcase Women’s Excellence in Computational Science

Today the ISC 2016 conference announced that their Tuesday keynote session will highlight contributions from female researchers and scientists in advancing the field of computational science. “This year, Dr. Jacqueline H. Chen, a distinguished member of technical staff at Sandia National Laboratories, has been invited to keynote on Tuesday, June 21, on the topic of advancing the science of turbulent combustion using petascale and exascale simulations.”

Compute Canada Joins Women in HPC Network

Compute Canada has become the first international partner to join the Women in High Performance Computing (WHPC) network. “Achieving gender balance in advanced research computing is an important goal for Compute Canada,” said Mark Dietrich, President and Chief Executive Officer Compute Canada. “This is not just an important equality and balance issue. We know achieving gender balance, and diversity in general, improves innovation and research outputs. In order to meet the growing demand for HPC skillsets that address the increasing requirements of key industrial and academic sectors we must support and grow our skill base in this area.”

Ada Lovelace Competition to Inspire Female Programmers

Marking the 200th anniversary of the birth of Ada Lovelace, the woman widely regarded as the first computer programmer, a competition aims to inspire female students by asking what they would most like to communicate to Lovelace about 21st century technology.

New Magazine Celebrates PRACE Women in HPC

The Partnership for Advanced Computing in Europe in Europe has published the first edition of PRACE Women in HPC Magazine, a collection of success stories celebrating the contribution women make to HPC and computational science. Designed to put the spotlight on the scientific advances made in the past year, the magazine tells the story of women who help make PRACE a world-leading force in HPC-enabled science and the march towards Exascale computing.

Women in HPC Workshop at ISC High Performance 2015

“Our workshop at ISC will bring together female early career researchers with a focus on European participation, providing them with the opportunity to showcase their work and network with role-models and peers in an environment designed to reduce the stereotype of men dominating the field of HPC. The workshop will open with an introduction on current research by the Women in HPC network, what the current demographics of the HPC community are and the differences experienced by men and women in the field.”

Women in HPC to Teach Supercomputing at PRACE Days15

As part of PRACE Days15 next month, the Women in HPC Network will conduct a general introduction session on High Performance Computing.

Nearly 200 Years after Ada, Women Becoming More Visible in Scientific Computing

In this special guest perspective from Scientific Computing World, Tom Wilkie considers some initiatives to counter the widespread impression that scientific computing is solely the preserve of nerdy men.