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Video: What IBM’s 5 Nanometer Transistors Mean for You

In this video, Nicolas Loubet from IBM Research describes how IBM’s new 5 nanometer transistors will provide huge power savings that could enable mobile devices to run for days without a charge. “The resulting increase in performance will help accelerate cognitive computing, the Internet of Things (IoT) and other data-intensive applications delivered in the cloud.”

Leaping Forward in Energy Efficiency with the DOME 64-bit μDataCenter

In this slidecast, Ronald P. Luijten from IBM Research in Zurich presents: DOME 64-bit μDataCenter. “I like to call it a data­cen­ter in a shoe­box. With the com­bi­na­tion of power and ener­gy ef­fi­cien­cy, we be­lieve the mi­cro­serv­er will be of in­te­rest be­yond the DOME pro­ject, par­tic­u­lar­ly for cloud data centers and Big Data ana­ly­tics ap­pli­ca­tions.”

Podcast: IBM Researchers Store Data on a Single Atom

Today IBM announced it has created the world’s smallest magnet using a single atom – and stored one bit of data on it. Currently, hard disk drives use about 100,000 atoms to store a single bit. The ability to read and write one bit on one atom creates new possibilities for developing significantly smaller and denser storage devices, that could someday, for example, enable storing the entire iTunes library of 35 million songs on a device the size of a credit card.

IBM Research Alliance Develops First 7nm Node

Today IBM Research announced that working with alliance partners at SUNY Polytechnic Institute’s Colleges of Nanoscale Science and Engineering it has produced the semiconductor industry’s first 7nm node test chips with functional transistors. According to IBM, the breakthrough underscores the company’s continued leadership and long-term commitment to semiconductor technology research.

Memory-Driven Near-Data Acceleration and its Application to DOME/SKA

In this video from the 2014 HPC User Forum in Seattle, Jan van Lunteren from IBM Research Labs in Zurich presents: Memory-Driven Near-Data Acceleration.