Sign up for our newsletter and get the latest HPC news and analysis.
Send me information from insideHPC:


Articles and news on parallel programming and code modernization

Achieving the Best QoE: Performance Libraries Accelerate Code Execution

The increasing consumerization of IT means that even staid business applications like accounting need to have the performance and ease of use of popular consumer apps. Fortunately, developers now have access to a powerful group of libraries that can instantly increase application performance – with little or no rewriting of older code. Here’s a quick rundown of Intel-provided libraries and how to get them.

How to Design Scalable HPC, Deep Learning and Cloud Middleware for Exascale Systems

DK Panda from Ohio State University gave this talk at the Stanford HPC Conference. “This talk will focus on challenges in designing HPC, Deep Learning, and HPC Cloud middleware for Exascale systems with millions of processors and accelerators. For the HPC domain, we will discuss about the challenges in designing runtime environments for MPI+X (PGAS – OpenSHMEM/UPC/CAF/UPC++, OpenMP, and CUDA) programming models taking into account support for multi-core systems (Xeon, OpenPower, and ARM), high-performance networks, GPGPUs (including GPUDirect RDMA), and energy-awareness.”

Call for Submissions: OpenMPCon and IWOMP 2019 in New Zealand

The OpenMP community has issued its Call for Submissions for OpenMPCon 2019 and IWOMP 2019. The events take place September 9-13 in Auckland, New Zealand. “OpenMPCon is the annual conference for OpenMP developers to discuss of all aspects of parallel programming with OpenMP. The International Workshop on OpenMP (IWOMP) is an annual workshop dedicated to the promotion and advancement of all aspects of parallel programming with OpenMP.”

Intel High-Performance Python Extends to Machine Learning and Data Analytics

One of the big surprises of the past few years has been the spectacular rise in the use of Python* in high-performance computing applications. With the latest releases of Intel® Distribution for Python, included in Intel® Parallel Studio XE 2019, the numerical and scientific computing capabilities of high-performance Python now extends to machine learning and data analytics.

Making Computer Vision Real Today – For Any Application

With the demand for intelligent vision solutions increasing everywhere from edge to cloud, enterprises of every type are demanding visually-enabled – and intelligent – applications. Up till now, most intelligent computer vision applications have required a wealth of machine learning, deep learning, and data science knowledge to enable simple object recognition, much less facial recognition or collision avoidance. That’s changed with the introduction of Intel’s Distribution of OpenVINO toolkit.

Improving HPC Performance with the Roofline Model

“When we are optimizing our objective is to determine which hardware resource the code is exhausting (there must be one, otherwise it would run faster!), and then see how to modify the code to reduce its need for that resource. It is therefore essential to understand the maximum theoretical performance of that aspect of the machine, since if we are already achieving the peak performance we should give up, or choose a different algorithm.”

Python Power: Intel SDK Accelerates Python Development and Execution

It was with one goal – accelerating Python execution performance – that lead to the creation of Intel Distribution for Python, a set of tools designed to provide Python application performance right out of the box, usually with no code changes required. This sponsored post from Intel highlights how Intel SDK can enhance Python development and execution, as Python continues to grow in popularity.

Putting Computer Vision to Work with OpenVINO

OpenVINO is a single toolkit, optimized for Intel hardware, that the data scientist and AI software developer can use for quickly developing high-performance applications that employ neural network inference and deep learning to emulate human vision over various platforms. “This toolkit supports heterogeneous execution across CPUs and computer vision accelerators including GPUs, Intel® Movidius™ hardware, and FPGAs.”

Video: Speeding up Programs with OpenACC in GCC

Thomas Schwinge from Mentor gave this talk at FOSDEM’19. “Requiring only few changes to your existing source code, OpenACC allows for easy parallelization and code offloading to accelerators such as GPUs. We will present a short introduction of GCC and OpenACC, implementation status, examples, and performance results.”

Argonne Looks to Singularity for HPC Code Portability

Over at Argonne, Nils Heinonen writes that Researchers are using the open source Singularity framework as a kind of Rosetta Stone for running supercomputing code almost anywhere. “Once a containerized workflow is defined, its image can be snapshotted, archived, and preserved for future use. The snapshot itself represents a boon for scientific provenance by detailing the exact conditions under which given data were generated: in theory, by providing the machine, the software stack, and the parameters, one’s work can be completely reproduced.”