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Video: Jack Wells from ORNL on his new role as VP of OpenACC.org

Today OpenACC.org announced a newly elected vice president reflecting increased user influence within the organization. Additionally, the organization announced its 2019 Annual Meeting will be hosted by RIKEN Center for Computational Science (RIKEN R-CCS) in Japan, as well as the schedule of upcoming hackathons and bootcamps around the world.

Video: Speeding up Programs with OpenACC in GCC

Thomas Schwinge from Mentor gave this talk at FOSDEM’19. “Requiring only few changes to your existing source code, OpenACC allows for easy parallelization and code offloading to accelerators such as GPUs. We will present a short introduction of GCC and OpenACC, implementation status, examples, and performance results.”

Call For Proposals: Worldwide GPU Hackathons in 2019

ORNL has issued its Call for Proposals for a set of global GPU Hackathons in 2019. “A GPU hackathon is a 5-day coding event in which teams of developers port their applications to run on GPUs, or optimize their applications that already run on GPUs. Each team consists of three or more developers who are intimately familiar with (some part of) their application, and they work alongside two mentors with GPU programming expertise. The mentors come from universities, national laboratories, supercomputing centers, government institutions, and vendors.”

Video: How OpenACC Enables Scientists to port their codes to GPUs and Beyond

In this video SC18, Jack Wells from ORNL describes how OpenACC enables scientists to port their codes to GPUs and other HPC platforms. “OpenACC, a directive-based high-level parallel programming model, has gained rapid momentum among scientific application users – the key drivers of the specification. The user-friendly programming model has facilitated acceleration of over 130 applications including CAM, ANSYS Fluent, Gaussian, VASP, Synopsys on multiple platforms and is also seen as an entry-level programming model for the top supercomputers (Top500 list) such as Summit, Sunway Taihulight, and Piz Daint. As in previous years, this BoF invites scientists, programmers, and researchers to discuss their experiences in adopting OpenACC for scientific applications, learn about the roadmaps from implementers and the latest developments in the specification.”

Sunita Chandrasekaran Receives NSF Grant to Create Powerful Software Framework

Over at the University of Delaware, Julie Stewart writes that assistant professor Sunita Chandrasekaran has received an NSF grant to develop frameworks to adapt code for GPU supercomputers. She is working with complex patterns known as wavefronts, which are commonly found in scientific codes used in analyzing the flow of neutrons in a nuclear reactor, extracting patterns from biomedical data or predicting atmospheric patterns.

Video: Introduction to OpenACC

Vasileios Karakasis from CSCS gave this talk at the the Directive Based GPU Programming Workshop. “Directives-based programming facilitates the task of parallelizing your application by letting you focus on its parallel logic rather than on the very details and the low-level intricacies of the GPU architecture. In this course, we will introduce the OpenACC programming paradigms for the GPU. We will cover the parallel execution model and how it can be used to leverage parallelism, the memory model and how this differs from the classic CPU paradigm.”

Porting HPC Codes with Directives and OpenACC

In this video from ISC 2018, Michael Wolfe from OpenACC.org describes how scientists can port their code to accelerated computing. “OpenACC is a user-driven directive-based performance-portable parallel programming model designed for scientists and engineers interested in porting their codes to a wide-variety of heterogeneous HPC hardware platforms and architectures with significantly less programming effort than required with a low-level model.”

OpenACC Helps Scientists Port their code at the Center for Application Readiness (CARR)

In this video, Jack Wells from the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility and Duncan Poole from NVIDIA describe how OpenACC enabled them to port their codes to the new Summit supercomputer. “In preparation for next-generation supercomputer Summit, the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) selected 13 partnership projects into its Center for Accelerated Application Readiness (CAAR) program. A collaborative effort of application development teams and staff from the OLCF Scientific Computing group, CAAR is focused on redesigning, porting, and optimizing application codes for Summit’s hybrid CPU–GPU architecture.”

Call for Applications: NCSA GPU Hackathon in September

NCSA is now accepting team applications for the Blue Waters GPU Hackathon. This event will take place September 10-14, 2018 in Illinois. “General-purpose Graphics Processing Units (GPGPUs) potentially offer exceptionally high memory bandwidth and performance for a wide range of applications. A challenge in utilizing such accelerators has been learning how to program them. These hackathons are intended to help overcome this challenge for new GPU programmers and also to help existing GPU programmers to further optimize their applications – a great opportunity for graduate students and postdocs. Any and all GPU programming paradigms are welcome.”

Accelerating HPC Applications on NVIDIA GPUs with OpenACC

Doug Miles from NVIDIA gave this talk at the Stanford HPC Conference. “This talk will include an introduction to the OpenACC programming model, provide examples of its use in a number of production applications, explain how OpenACC and CUDA Unified Memory working together can dramatically simplify GPU programming, and close with a few thoughts on OpenACC future directions.”